Lessons from the Light: What We Can Learn from the near-Death Experience

By Kenneth Ring; Evelyn Elsaesser Valarino | Go to book overview

Chapter Two
The View from the Top:
Dust Sightings
and Misplaced Shoes

When one reflects on the contents of the NDE narratives I presented in the last chapter, it is hard to deny that something truly extraordinary has happened to these individuals. But perhaps it is also their tone of assurance and the obvious sincerity of their words that convince most listeners that what they have experienced while close to death constitutes a revelation containing some the essential truths about life and about how life is meant to be lived.

Certainly, virtually all NDErs are themselves persuaded that what they have seen and understood during their vision represents something as authentic as it is indubitable. And, by the same measure, typically, these individuals are equally sure that what they have experienced is no dream, fantasy, or hallucination. More than one such person has asseverated to me, and with great emphasis, that their NDE was "more real than life itself," or "more real than you and I sitting here talking about it," or similar avowals. In this connection, I particularly remember one middle-aged man asserting with vigor that his experience was "totally objective and utterly real."

Given both the consistent and insistent character of these avowals, it would be foolish and certainly cavalier to disregard this kind of testimony.

-55-

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