Latin American Journalism

By Michael B. Salwen; Bruce Garrison | Go to book overview

Chapter 3
The Practice of Journalism

Various social, political, and economic forces may enhance or inhibit the routine work of journalists in Latin America. This chapter examines how advertisers, political and economic conditions, and extra- and quasi-governmental organizations such as terrorist organizations and hit squads may put pressures on the news media to influence media content. This chapter also examines the professional orientations of journalists in the region. Latin American journalists have long been characterized as very political. Both government and political party involvement-often through financial support or outright ownership -- in the press is a major characteristic in the practice of journalism. Journalism education in Latin America continues to improve. Relying on the North American model developed earlier in the century, many Latin American journalists today have the opportunity for college- level education in journalism. This chapter focuses on new efforts and systems for improving the performance of journalists through formalized education and training. Colégio laws are the major legal forces that control qualifications of journalists to practice in many countries in the region. Perhaps most significant, however, in influencing the daily work of journalists in some Latin American nations is violence and threats of violence from terrorist organizations. The extensive nature of violent acts in countries such as Colombia and Peru have had a chilling effect on news reporting. Journalists continue to be murdered and kidnapped for unfavorable stories or for positions involving political and social issues of the day.

The daily practice of journalism in Latin America involves a number of complex interrelationships among journalists, media organizations, and various sectors of society. Perhaps the most important sector with which journalists must deal is the government. The subject of press -- government relations is of such central importance that the previous chapter was devoted to that topic. In addition to the press' relationships with governments, journalists must also interact with the public and advertisers.

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Latin American Journalism
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • Acknowledgments viii
  • Foreword xi
  • Chapter 1 - A New Decade 1
  • Chapter 2 - Press and Government Relations 15
  • Chapter 3 - The Practice of Journalism 34
  • Chapter 4 - New World Information And Communication Order 61
  • Chapter 5 - News Agencies 84
  • Chapter 6 - Newspapers 102
  • Chapter7 - Magazines and Books 124
  • Chapter 8 - Broadcast Media 145
  • Chapter 9 - Advertising and Public Relations 167
  • Chapter 10 - Into the Next Century: Conclusions 185
  • References 191
  • Index 208
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