All Is Forgiven: The Secular Message in American Protestantism

By Marsha G. Witten | Go to book overview

Notes

CHAPTER ONE
PROTESTANT PREACHING IN CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN CULTURE
1
Delaware Valley Community Church, Yardley Pa., April 1990.
2
For example, recent Gallup polls have found that nine out of ten Americans claim to believe in God; 60 percent affirm the importance of prayer in their lives; and 85 percent say that religion is “very” or “fairly” important to them. See Gallup and Castelli, The People's Religion, 45, 59.
3
For recent reviews of traditional theorizing about secularization, see Dobbelaere, “Secularization: A Multi-Dimensional Concept”; and Tschannen, “The Secularization Paradigm.”
4
Berger, The Sacred Canopy, chaps. 5 and 6; Fenn, Liturgies and Trials, esp. chap. 1.
5
Weber, “Science as a Vocation,” 143.
6
Luckmann, The Invisible Religion, 99–102.
7
Weber, “Science as a Vocation,” 155.
8
See, for example, Demerath and Williams, A Bridging of Faiths.
9
Bellah, Beyond Belief, 42–44; Lindbeck, The Nature of Doctrine, 32–40.
10
In 1990, the latest year for which data are available, 2,649,073 persons were reported as adherents (approximately 1.4 percent of the U.S. population). The figure comes from a personal conversation with Norman Green, Association of Statisticians of American Religious Bodies. Members tend to be Caucasian (95.7 percent) and to have levels of income and education significantly higher than the national average. The median age of members is fiftyfour years. Data are from Presbyterian Panel, 1991–1993 Background Report, 20, 24, 28.
11
Wuthnow, The Struggle for America's Soul, 72.
12
Presbyterian Panel, Background Report, 18.
13
Wuthnow, The Struggle for America's Soul, 75.
14
Steinfels, “Presbyterians Reject Report on Sex.”
15
The membership figure of 15,238,283 is for 1992. The income of Southern Baptists is at the national average; educational level is slightly above it. Slightly more than 2 percent of Southern Baptists are African-American. The membership figure was reported in a personal conversation with Pat Strum, Research Services Department, Sunday School Board of the Southern Baptist Convention. Data on income and education are from Southern Baptist Convention, 1990 Southern Baptist Constituency Study, 2. Information on African-American membership comes from a personal conversation with Norman Green, Association of Statisticians of American Religious Bodies.

-153-

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