The Gnat Is Older Than Man: Global Environment and Human Agenda

By Christopher D. Stone | Go to book overview

CHAPTER VI
The Economist's Prescriptions: Taxes
and Tradable Permits

AS WE HAVE SEEN, many of the maladies of the global environment are symptoms of frailties in the world political order. As long as the earth is partitioned politically, individual nations will be tempted to overexploit commons resources and dump their wastes somewhere on the other side of their frontiers. Thus, the international environmental effort is rightly concerned with reforming political relationships so as to reduce the aggravations caused by international conflicts.

But it is folly to suppose that if the nation-state system were to be replaced by a world government, the problems of the environment would vanish—or even necessarily become more manageable. If we examine modern governments, such as those in the United States, there is hardly reason for optimism that the larger and more distant the governing unit, the more responsive it is to its constituents, or the more successfully it resists capture by competing economically and culturally defined interests. Indeed, around the world, a lot of conventional long-established governments are ungluing from a less divisive concoction of religious and cultural factions than that which a true world government would have to contend with.

Yet, while a unified government with plenary powers to command obedience across the globe does not, and perhaps ought not, exist, it is helpful to come at our subject by imagining for a moment that there were such a One World Government (we will call it the Authority).* Then we can ask—to clarify our objectives—how would that

____________________
*
One “provocative” (to put it mildly) illustration of a purely economic, one-globe perspective has already been recorded: the World Bank economist's memo that from the global point of view, it would be better if heavily polluting industries were encouraged to migrate from richer countries to poorer, inasmuch as the aggregate costs of pollution would decline. See note p. 68, supra.

-122-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Gnat Is Older Than Man: Global Environment and Human Agenda
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 341

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.