Madness and Democracy: The Modern Psychiatric Universe

By Marcel Gauchet; Gladys Swain et al. | Go to book overview

Notes

FOREWORD
1
The only book comparable to Foucault's work I know that can be said to have raised a similar set of issues by way of an independent inspiration is Klaus Dörner, Madmen and the Bourgeoisie: A Social History of Insanity and Psychiatry, trans. Joachim Neugroschel and Jean Steinberg (Oxford: Blackwell, 1981). The German original, B×rger und Irre, was published eight years after Foucault's book on madness, in 1969. For Gauchet's account of his and Swain's encounter with Foucault, see his introduction, “A la recherche d'une autre histoire de la folie,” in Gladys Swain, Dialogue avec l'insensé: Essais d'histoire de la psychiatrie. Précédé de: A la Recherche d'une autre histoire de la folie, par Marcel Gauchet (Paris: Gallimard, 1994).
2
For some new information on these developments, see Dora B. Weiner, The Citizen-Patient in Revolutionary and Imperial Paris (Baltimore and London: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1993). This book contains an extensive and exemplary bibliography. Pinel's act of removing chains had been anticipated a few years earlier at Bicêtre by Jean-Baptiste Pussin, the lay practitioner and former inmate who was a pioneer in methods of human treatment. See ibid., 257, where a famous picture of the scene at the Salpêtrière, by Tony Robert-Fleury, is reproduced.
3
Michel Foucault, Madness and Civilization: A History of Insanity in the Age of Reason, trans. Richard Howard (New York: New American Library, 1967), 199. This English version was made from a truncated French edition. In the original version, Folie et déraison: Histoire de la folie à l'òge classique (Paris: Plon, 1961; rpt. Paris: Gallimard, 1972), the passage appears on p. 505.
4
Translated from the French by Oscar Burge, with a foreword by Charles Taylor (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1997).
5
For recent but conflicting views and additional information on them, see Jan Goldstein, Console and Classify: The French Psychiatric Profession in the Nineteenth Century (New York, Cambridge University Press, 1987), and Dora B. Weiner, The Citizen-Patient in Revolutionary and Imperial Paris, which contains an extensive annotated bibliography.
6
For the first point of view, see the work of Klaus Dörner, Madmen and the Bourgeoisie, cited above; the second view is strongly present in Jan Goldstein, Console and Classify.
7
See Gladys Swain, Dialogue avec l'insensé, xlvii ff. The work of Foucault referred to appeared in English as I, Pierre Rivière, having slaughtered my mother, my sister, and my brother: A Case of Parricide in the 19th Century, ed. Michel Foucault, trans. Frank Jellinek (New York: Pantheon Books, 1975).

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