The Vicksburg Campaign: April 1862-July 1863

By David G. Martin | Go to book overview

CHAPTER VII
Grant's Final Drive

The failure of all four projects attempted since the end of January (the DeSoto Canal, Lake Providence expedition, Yazoo Pass Project, and Steele's Bayou expedition) left Grant in a most awkward position. Though his troops had been encamped for nearly three months at Young's Point, almost in sight of Vicksburg, he was still no closer to capturing the Confederate fortress than he had been when he first moved against Holly Springs. Three options now lay before him. One was to assault Vicksburg at the Chickasaw Bluffs where Sherman had attacked in December; Grant dismissed this as too costly, especially in view of the increased size of the Vicksburg garrison (now at 30,000). A second option was to return to Memphis and attack by way of either Holly Springs or Grenada; Grant dismissed this choice because he had already attempted it unsuccessfully the previous December. This left him with his third option: to move his entire command south of Vicksburg through the more open country to its southeast.

To carry out this project, Grant needed to clear an all-water route for his supply transports from his base at Milliken's Bend to a point near New Carthage, about 30 miles below Vicksburg. His plan was to gather as many supply transports as he could at New Carthage, and use them to carry his troops across the river to capture Grand Gulf. Once he possessed Grand Gulf, he would be free to operate at will in the rear of Vicksburg. Before he did this, though, he was urged by General Halleck to help Banks

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The Vicksburg Campaign: April 1862-July 1863
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Great Campaign Series *
  • Title Page *
  • Contents *
  • Maps 6
  • Sidebars 6
  • Preface to the Series 7
  • Introduction 9
  • Chapter I - First Threats 11
  • Chapter II - The Fall of New Orleans 25
  • Chapter III - The Threat Becomes Real 37
  • Chapter IV - The Saga of the Arkansas 53
  • Chapter V - Grant Takes Command 69
  • Chapter VI - Grant the Relentless 83
  • Chapter VII - Grant's Final Drive 99
  • Chapter VIII - Vicksburg: the First Assaults 119
  • Chapter IX - The Siege 137
  • Chapter X - The Vicksburg Mine 155
  • Chapter XI - Port Hudson 165
  • Chapter XII - The Surrender 193
  • Epilogue 205
  • Bibliography 211
  • Orders of Battle 217
  • Index 231
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