The Vicksburg Campaign: April 1862-July 1863

By David G. Martin | Go to book overview

Epilogue

General Johnston was preparing to move against Grant's rear on 4 July when he received the sad news that Vicksburg had surrendered. He promptly ordered a retreat to Jackson, which he reached on the 7th. Here he posted his 36,000 men in the line of rifle pits erected earlier under Pemberton's orders. The line was not a particularly strong one, stretching in a westward arc from the Canton Road northwest of town to the Pearl River south of town. Johnston posted Loring's division on the right of his line, Walker and French in the center, and Breckinridge on the left, with cavalry on both flanks.

Johnston's command was pursued by Sherman, who had been guarding Grant's rear from the Big Black River railroad bridge to Haynes' Bluff. Sherman had a makeshift force of 48,000 men, consisting of IX Corps, XIII Corps, XV Corps, one division of XVI Corps and one division of XVII Corps. All together he had twelve divisions under his command, comprising two-thirds of Grant's army.

Sherman's advance forces reached the outskirts of Jackson on the night of 9 July and began skirmishing with Johnston's outposts. He closed in on the city the next day, placing IX Corps on the left, XV in the center and XIII on the right. Sherman felt the enemy lines were too strong to attack head on, so he prepared for a siege, figuring that Johnston did not have enough supplies stored up to hold on for long.

Sharp skirmishing began on the 10th and lasted for several days. Sherman was still in no hurry to direct an assault, though

-205-

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The Vicksburg Campaign: April 1862-July 1863
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Great Campaign Series *
  • Title Page *
  • Contents *
  • Maps 6
  • Sidebars 6
  • Preface to the Series 7
  • Introduction 9
  • Chapter I - First Threats 11
  • Chapter II - The Fall of New Orleans 25
  • Chapter III - The Threat Becomes Real 37
  • Chapter IV - The Saga of the Arkansas 53
  • Chapter V - Grant Takes Command 69
  • Chapter VI - Grant the Relentless 83
  • Chapter VII - Grant's Final Drive 99
  • Chapter VIII - Vicksburg: the First Assaults 119
  • Chapter IX - The Siege 137
  • Chapter X - The Vicksburg Mine 155
  • Chapter XI - Port Hudson 165
  • Chapter XII - The Surrender 193
  • Epilogue 205
  • Bibliography 211
  • Orders of Battle 217
  • Index 231
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