Killing Monsters: Why Children Need Fantasy, Super Heroes, and Make-Believe Violence

By Gerard Jones | Go to book overview

6
Calming the Storm

There is a correlation between violent crime rates and intense entertainment violence, but the correlation is the opposite of what the usual hypotheses would suggest. The entertainment industry's bloodiest peaks come after real crime has come to dominate the news media and national conversation.

The late 1920s saw a rise in crime and the newspapers' preoccupation with bootlegger wars. By 1930, public opinion polls showed that "lawlessness" had become the leading concern of Americans. That same year, a low-budget entry in the minor genre of gangster movies, Little Caesar, became an unexpected box-office smash. Over the next few years, the public devoured a cycle of ever more brutal crime movies with an appetite that the Hollywood factory was barely able to meet. In 1931, the surprise success of Dracula and Frankenstein launched another violent, lurid genre. Many psychologists, politicians, and religious leaders blamed the movies for inspiring the lawlessness, but crime rates began dropping after 1933, when crime and horror movies were still going strong. Those movies began losing box-office steam only after the majority of Americans had begun calming down about crime.

Thirty years later, rising crime rates, assassinations, and the war in Vietnam were raising public fears of violence to unprecedented levels—and then intensely violent, horrific movies like Bonnie and

-97-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Killing Monsters: Why Children Need Fantasy, Super Heroes, and Make-Believe Violence
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents *
  • Foreword vi
  • Acknowledgments viii
  • 1 - Being Strong 1
  • 2 - Seeing What We're Prepared to See 23
  • 3 - The Magic Wand 45
  • 4 - The Good Fight 65
  • 5 - Girl Power 77
  • 6 - Calming the Storm 97
  • 7 - Fantasy and Reality 113
  • 8 - The Courage to Change 129
  • 9 - Vampire Slayers 149
  • 10 - Shooters 165
  • 11 - Model, Mirror, and Mentor 183
  • 12 - Not So Alone 205
  • 13 - Growing Up 219
  • Notes 233
  • Index 251
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 261

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.