Child Rights & Remedies

By Robert C. Fellmeth | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

I am indebted to my colleagues in the child advocacy movement—the members of the National Association of Counsel for Children, the National Association of Child Advo cates, the Children's Defense Fund, the Child Welfare League, the ABA Center on Children and the Law, First Star, Foundation of America—Youth in Action, the Maternal and Child Health Access Project, Campaign for TobaccoFree Kids, Children Now, the American Acad emy of Pediatrics, Children's Hospitals, teachers, social workers, child care providers, and the many other advocates who attempt to advance the interests of children. Those advo cates include many attorneys––from the heroic efforts of the Castano lawyers to protect children from tobacco, to the juvenile courts and legal aid attorneys who work one on one to help children day after day. They are joined by important foundations, including the David and Lucile Packard Foundation, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the California Wellness Foundation, the ConAgra Foundation, the Rosenberg Foundation, The Sierra Health Founda tion, the Leon Strauss Foundation, the Maximilian E. & Marion O. Hoffman Foundation, the Weingart Foundation, the Mattel Foundation, the Annie E. Casey Foundation, and the large number of anonymous givers who care about children and contribute for their effective representation.

I am grateful for the review and comments on early drafts of this work by Deborah Stein of the National Association of Child Advocates and by Nancy Fellmeth of Families for Early Autism Treatment. I am also grateful for the help and assistance from Public Citizen and other public interest advocates throughout the nation from Ralph Nader to Scott Harshbarger, Joshua Rosenkranz, and Charles Lewis—whose assistance in the first chapter of this work has been invaluable. In addition, Dean Daniel B. Rodriguez, the faculty of the University of San Diego (USD) School of Law, USD President Alice Hayes, and USD Provost Frank Lazarus have been important supporters of our work over the years.

I am grateful for the editorial and research assistance of Elisa Weichel, Adminis trative Director of the Children's Advocacy Institute (CAI). Also, this book would have been impossible without the intellectual contribution and dedicated support of Julie D'Angelo Fellmeth, Administrative Director of CAI's parent organization, the Center for Public Interest Law (CPIL). Further, I am indebted to all of the other current and prior staff of CAI and CPIL, including Lupe AlonzoDiaz, Stephanie Reighley, Louise Jones, and Cindy Dana, as well as Steve Barrow, June Brashares, Terry Coble, Leanne Cotham, Margaret Dalton, Kathryn Dresslar, Gene Erbin, Cheryl Forbes, Barry Fraser, Beth Givens, John Hardesty, Inez Hope, Jim Jacobson, Sharon Kalemkiarian, Lynn Kersey, Joy Kolender, Christine Harbs Mailloux, Kathleen Murphy Mallinger, Mark McWilliams, Claudia Terrazas Mellon, Betty Mulroy Mohr, Rusty Nichols, Carl Oshiro, Kim Parks, Kathleen Quinn, Randy Reiter, Diana Roberts, Kate Turnbull, Jim Wheaton, and Ellen Widess. And I thank Jessica Heldman, Molly Selwey and Christine Basie for their proofint and comments.

I am thankful for the enduring support of some of our leading child advocates in their service on CAI's Council for Children. These leaders in pediatrics, education, social work, business, and law serve without compensation and spend many hours helping to guide the Children's Advocacy Institute. They currently include our founding Chairman Paul A. Peterson, and our current Chairman Tom Papageorge, as well as Martin Fern, Birt Harvey, M.D., Louise Horvitz, M.S.W., Psy.D., the Hon. Leon Kaplan, Gary Redenbacher, Gary Richwald, M.D., M.P.H., Blair Sadler, Gloria Perez Samson, Alan Shumacher, M.D., F.A.A.P., and Owen Smith. Past members of and/or special consultants to the Council have included Frank Alessio, Nancy Daly, Robert Frandzel, Theodore Hurwitz, Ralph Jonas, Quynh Kieu, Harvey Levine, Mary O'Connor, the Hon. Robert Presley, and W. Willard Wirtz.

Finally, the spiritual underpinning for this book and for our child advocacy comes from our longstanding mentors, Sol and Helen Price.

-17-

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