Home Fires Burning: Food, Politics, and Everyday Life in World War I Berlin

By Belinda J. Davis | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

It has not been lost on me that even as I read and wrote day after day about people operating under conditions of extreme discomfort and distress, my own experience in writing this book has been joyful, due largely to the many people who have offered kind support over several years. This book began as a dissertation under the guidance of Geoff Eley, Bill Sewell, Bill Rosenberg, and Sherry Ortner, whose influence still deeply marks the project. Geoff Eley remains a wonderful mentor. I deeply thank my extraordinary colleagues at Rutgers University, among whom I can only name a few here, including Michael Adas, Omer Bartov, Mia Bay, Rudy Bell, Paul Clemens, Ziva Galili, Dee Garrison, John Gillis, Jennifer Jones, Donald Kelley, Alice Kessler-Harris, Jim Livingston, Phyllis Mack, Matt Matsuda, David Oshinsky, and Bonnie Smith. I am thankful for fellowships at the Rutgers Center for Historical Analysis, under directors Victoria de Grazia and John Chambers; at the Georgetown Center for German and European Studies, under Samuel Barnes and Roger Chickering; and at the Max-Planck-Institut für Geschichte, directed by Hartmut Lehmann. I am grateful for the uniformly kind help of staff members at the archives in which I worked, including particularly Dr. Beck, Dr. Lippert, and Frau Bühring of the Brandenburgische Landeshauptarchiv; Herr Zarwell at the Bundesarchiv Lichterfelde; and Jürgen Wetzel of the Landesarchiv Berlin. Many thanks also to Lewis Bateman, Paula Wald, and Stephanie Wenzel at the University of North Carolina Press. Rutgers University provided a grant to support this book.

I am extremely grateful to the friends and colleagues who saw this project through with me. Bonnie Smith, Peter Appelbaum, Marion Kaplan, and Nancy Reagin commented on the entire manuscript and helped in myriad other ways; I thank them, as well as two very helpful anonymous press readers, deeply. Members of the German Women's History Study Group, including Bonnie Anderson, Delores Augustine, Maria Baader, Rebecca Boehling, Renate Bridenthal, Jane Caplan, Atina Grossmann, Amy Hackett, Deborah Hertz, Maria Hoehn, Young Sun Hong, Marion Kaplan, Jan Lambertz, Molly Nolan, Molly O'Donnell, and Nancy Reagin, provided insightful comments on several chapters along with much moral support. In

-xiii-

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Home Fires Burning: Food, Politics, and Everyday Life in World War I Berlin
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents *
  • Illustrations *
  • Maps & Figures *
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • Home Fires Burning 15
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - Germany from Peace to War 9
  • 2 - Bread, Cake, and Just Deserts 24
  • 3 - Women of Lesser Means 48
  • 4 - Battles over Butter 76
  • 5 - One View of How Politics Worked in World War I Berlin 93
  • 6 - A Food Dictatorship 114
  • 7 - Soup, Stew, and Eating German 137
  • 8 - Food for the Weak, Food for the Strong 159
  • 9 - The End of Faith 190
  • 10 - Germany from War to Peace? 219
  • Conclusion 237
  • Notes 247
  • Bibliography 307
  • Index 343
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