American Alchemy: The California Gold Rush and Middle-Class Culture

By Brian Roberts | Go to book overview

Five
A Great and
Perverse Paradise

Theodore Johnson was one of the earliest forty-niners. A would-be newspaperman on the trail of a good story, Johnson booked passage for California almost as soon as the first gold reports reached the eastern seaboard. He made every steamer connection on his way to the gold country; then, after a short stay to absorb the region's local color, he turned around and made every connection on his return east. Accordingly, he managed to write and publish an account of his adventures, Sights in the Gold Region and Scenes by the Way, before many of his fellow prospectors had even departed. As the title of his book suggests, Johnson was more interested in the adventure of travel than he was in finding gold. Early in his outward voyage, as his ship sailed into subtropical waters, Johnson and his fellow passengers keenly anticipated the novel sights and scenes of Hispanic America. Approaching the Caribbean, he reported that his shipmates filled “the lovely moonlight evenings with songs … till the ship almost danced in chorus.” A few nights later the islands of San Domingo and Cuba loomed on the horizon. Johnson's sense of anticipation reached a climax. Along with his crewmates, he rushed to the rails of the ship, “having in sight at the same time,” as he put it, “the two greatest and most perverted island paradises of the West Indies.” 1

Johnson's thrill at his first sight of a Latin American environment, his conscious sense that these environments were somehow “perverse,” was by no means unusual. Throughout 1849, thousands of gold seekers from the northeastern United States passed through Latin America. Some two-thirds of these emigrants sailed around Cape Horn; another third steamed to the Colombian Isthmus of Panama, crossing the isthmus by foot, mule, and canoe to pick up a sail ship or

-119-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
American Alchemy: The California Gold Rush and Middle-Class Culture
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents *
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • American Alchemy *
  • Introduction 1
  • One - California Gold and Filthy Lucre 17
  • Two - Gold Fever as a Cure 43
  • Three - Husbands and Wives 69
  • Four - Numberless Highways to Fairy Grottos 93
  • Five - A Great and Perverse Paradise 119
  • Six - California Is a Humbug 143
  • Seven - Widows and Helpmates 169
  • Eight - A Wild, Free, Disorderly, Grotesque Society 197
  • Nine - The Prude Fails 221
  • Ten - The End of the Flush Times 243
  • Conclusion 269
  • Notes 277
  • Index 321
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 328

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.