Picasso: Life and Art

By Pierre Daix; Olivia Emmet | Go to book overview

22
A MARRIAGE ENDS
1933-1934

The crisis in Picasso's marriage took a more dramatic turn in the middle of 1933, when Olga learned that her husband's efforts to prevent publication of Fernande Olivier's memoirs had failed and that the book would go on sale in September. Gertrude Stein had provoked this flood of retrospective jealousy by reading aloud during one of the couple's visits to the rue de Fleurus fragments about Picasso's youth and the Bateau-Lavoir from her Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas, which she was just finishing. When Olga heard Fernande's name, she rushed from the room, white with anger. Picasso asked Gertrude to continue reading. "You should try to catch her," Gertrude said. "All that is so long ago." Advice which was in vain. For years Olga refused to see her again, refused to countenance the notion of any trifling with her monopoly of a legitimate spouse. Picasso's private feelings about all this can be well imagined.

Drawings from that summer show the Minotaur in possession of a Marie-Thérèse as overwhelmed and abandoned as the inanimate version of herself in le Sauvetage (The Rescue). They were done at Boisgeloup, before leaving for a summer in Cannes. From Cannes she reappears indirectly in a series of ink drawings with gouache or watercolor, which begins, on 6 July, with a scene of bacchic orgy on the beach near Silène and then proceeds to a highly Surrealist phantasmagoria. On 15 July one of the wooden women chosifiées (thing-ified characters) of Une anatomie enters a room in which one sees the profile of a Boisgeloup sculpted head against an inner wall. On the 20th the bearded sculptor, his arm resting on a giant head, contemplates the statue of a nude Marie-Thérèse: a calm and serious scene. On the 27th a fragmented Minotaur reigns over a seaside landscape scattered with fragments of familiar objects. And the drawing of the 28th dismembers a statue. On the 30th a man's head balanced on a plaster arm and the head of the Minotaur on a vase stand before a naked woman. The drawings are virtuosic in the extreme but lack conviction. 1 Picasso was thinking ahead to mid-August, when the family would pack into the Hispano-Suiza for a pilgrimage to Barcelona. This was to be a return in grand style; they had taken rooms at the Ritz.

-227-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Picasso: Life and Art
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 450

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.