Creating Caring and Nurturing Educational Environments for African American Children

By Vivian Gunn Morris; Curtis L. Morris | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 10

Where Do We Go from Here?

There is a lot more to us African-Americans than our victimization. The best African-American studies programs emphasize the positive achievements, without forgetting the negative, including stories of what black people have done to themselves. The best lessons diversity studies can offer are not only the victim stories, but also the victory stories—the stories of triumph, often achieved in alliance with other groups.

Clarence Page, 1998, p. A17


RESCUE THE PERISHING

Walker (1998) agrees that desegregated public schools were designed to rescue African American children from segregated schools with poor teachers and administrators, poorly operated academic programs and activities, uncaring and neglectful parents, dilapidated school buildings, and scarce instructional resources. Yet these segregated African American schools were operated under the same watchful eye of white school boards who operated seemingly superior all-white schools in the same communities, via a “separate but equal” policy.

Until the last two decades, little had been written about the internal functioning of these schools or the positive impact of their efforts from the perspective of the individuals they served, African American students and their families, or the teachers and administrators who had the primary responsibility for operating the schools. This book is based on the case study of a segregated public school (grades 1–12) for African American children that was operated in a small town, Tuscumbia, Alabama, in the southeastern United States from

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