Social Comparison, Social Justice, and Relative Deprivation: Theoretical, Empirical, and Policy Perspectives

By John C. Masters; William P. Smith | Go to book overview

the educational attainment of middle- and lower class, white and black students, learning strategies that encourage mutual assistance have implications for social harmony and justice that extend beyond the classroom.


ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

The research reported in this chapter was supported, in part, by an RSDA Grant No. 00484 to Ruble, and by Grant No. 37215, both from the National Institute of Mental Health. We are grateful to William Damon and William Smith for comments on an earlier draft.


REFERENCES

Aboud F. E. ( 1985). "The development of a social comparison process in children". Child Development, 56, 682-688.

Albert S. ( 1977). "Temporal comparison theory". Psychological Review, 84, 485-503.

Bierman K. L., & Furman W. ( 1981). "Effects of role and assignment rationale on attitudes formed during peer tutoring". Journal of Educational Psychology, 73, 33-40.

Bock R. D. ( 1975). Multivariate statistics methods in behavioral research. New York: McGrawHill.

Boggiano A. K., & Ruble D. N. ( 1979). "Competence and the overjustification effect: A developmental study". Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 37, 1462- 1468.

Brickman P., & Bulman R. J. ( 1977). "Pleasure and pain in social comparison". In J. M. Suls & R. L. Miller (Eds.), Social comparison processes. Washington: Hemisphere.

Cohen J. ( 1960). "A coefficient of agreement for nominal scales". Educational and Psychological Measurement, 20, 37-46.

Collins W. A. ( 1973). "Effect of temporal separation between motivation, aggression, and consequences: A developmental study". Developmental Psychology, 8, 215-221.

Cook, T. D., Crosby, F., & Hennigan, K. ( 1977). "The construct validity of relative deprivation". In J. M. Suls & R. L. Miller (Eds.), Social comparison processes. Washington: Hemisphere.

Damon W. ( 1977). The social world of the child. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Diener E., & Srull T. K. ( 1979). "Self-awareness, psychological perspective, and selfreinforcement in relation to personal and social needs". Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 37, 413-423.

Dweck C. S., & Bempechat J. ( 1983). "Children's theories of intelligence: Consequences for learning". In S. G. Paris, G. M. Olson, & H. W. Stevenson (Eds.), Learning and motivation in the classroom (pp. 239-256). Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

Dweck C. S., & Elliott E. S. ( 1983). "Achievement motivation". In E. M. Hetherington (Ed.), "Socialization, personality, and social development". In P. J. Mussen (General Ed.), Carmichael's manual of child psychology ( 4th ed., Vol. III). New York: Wiley.

Enright R. D., Bjerstedt A., Enright W. F., Levy V. M., Lapsley D. K., Buss R. R., Harwell M., & Zindler M. ( 1984). "Distributive justice development: Cross-cultural, contextual, and longitudinal evaluations". Child Development, 55, 1737-1751.

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