Battle for Korea: A History of the Korean Conflict

By Robert J. Dvorchak | Go to book overview

5
An Entirely
New War

Having stumbled once into an ambush, Douglas MacArthur did it again. The Chinese presence in Korea was undeniable, but MacArthur believed—wrongly—the Chinese had been beaten because they were withdrawing. From his war room in Tokyo, MacArthur saw only a 60-mile distance between his front lines and the Yalu River. Now he ordered a final offensive to end the Korean War. He wanted the attack to begin November 15, but Eighth Army commander Walton Walker begged for some time to refortify his troops. Such an offensive required 4,000 tons a day of supplies, and Walker was only getting half that over his strained logistics lines. The attack was delayed until November 25, the day after Thanksgiving. Even then, Walker's army was short on ammunition, winter clothes and rations.

Above: U.S. tanks head south in retreat and ROK troops head north to try to stem the Red tide.

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Battle for Korea: A History of the Korean Conflict
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Battle for Korea - A History of the Korean Conflict *
  • Contents *
  • Maps *
  • Sidebars *
  • 1 - Surprise Invasion and U.S. Intervention *
  • 2 - Pusan Perimeter *
  • 3 - Inchon *
  • 4 - Across the 38th Parallel *
  • 5 - An Entirely New War *
  • 6 - Frozen Chosin *
  • 7 - Ridgway Takes Charge *
  • 8 - Macarthur Is Sacked *
  • 9 - Talking Peace, Waging War *
  • 10 - The Final Battles *
  • Epilogue - Korea Today *
  • 50th Anniversary of the Korean War - Commemorative Events 314
  • Bibliography *
  • Index *
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