Battle for Korea: A History of the Korean Conflict

By Robert J. Dvorchak | Go to book overview

10
The Final Battles

When Korea began to look like a bottomless swamp, Far East commander Mark Clark formulated a hard-line, MacArthuresque blueprint for a military solution in late 1952. His plan envisioned amphibious landings, airborne assaults and air and naval attacks on Manchuria. It also recommended dropping the ultimate weapon. "I consider it necessary that plans be made for the use of atomic weapons," Clark messaged the Joint Chiefs of Staff. But Washington said no. A presidential election was being held, and decisions on escalating the war would have to wait until the political fighting was resolved. Harry Truman, whose approval ratings had slipped to around 30 percent, had already decided against seeking re-election. The Democratic nominee to replace him was Illinois Gov. Adlai Stevenson. On the Republican side, Sen. Robert Taft at

President-elect Dwight D. Eisenhower, flanked by Gen. Mark Clark, top commander in the Far East, and James Van Fleet, Eighth Army commander, review troops in Korea.

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Battle for Korea: A History of the Korean Conflict
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Battle for Korea - A History of the Korean Conflict *
  • Contents *
  • Maps *
  • Sidebars *
  • 1 - Surprise Invasion and U.S. Intervention *
  • 2 - Pusan Perimeter *
  • 3 - Inchon *
  • 4 - Across the 38th Parallel *
  • 5 - An Entirely New War *
  • 6 - Frozen Chosin *
  • 7 - Ridgway Takes Charge *
  • 8 - Macarthur Is Sacked *
  • 9 - Talking Peace, Waging War *
  • 10 - The Final Battles *
  • Epilogue - Korea Today *
  • 50th Anniversary of the Korean War - Commemorative Events 314
  • Bibliography *
  • Index *
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 317

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Questia is operated by Cengage Learning.
    Copyright © 2015. All rights reserved.
    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.