Social Comparison, Social Justice, and Relative Deprivation: Theoretical, Empirical, and Policy Perspectives

By John C. Masters; William P. Smith | Go to book overview

another frame of reference, one that puts the current outcome in a better light (e.g., "at least I still have my health").

Further refinement of amelioration likelihood as a construct and as a framework category of factors, therefore, is also related to the single greatest challenge still facing RD theorists -- specifying determinants of various reactions to RD other than, and in addition to, resentment. Although in this chapter I have concentrated on reformulating the preconditions of resentment, RCT shows promise of being able to address this larger issue as well (see Mark & Folger, 1984). Perhaps in suggesting there is promise for ameliorating RCT's current shortcomings, I can be accused of attempting to blunt resentment about the inadequacies it has. If so, I hope there is more to resentment than that! Above all, I hope the present deprivation in our knowledge about these issues will be met by renewed efforts rather than by acceptance of any particular existing approach.


REFERENCES

Abelson R. P. ( 1983). Whatever became of consistency theory? Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 9, 37-54.

Adams J. S. ( 1965). Inequity in social exchange. In L. Berkowitz (Ed.), Advances in experimental social psychology (Vol. 2, pp. 267-299). New York: Academic Press.

Austin J. L. ( 1961). A plea for excuses. In J. D. Urmson & G. Warnock (Eds.), Philosophical papers. Oxford: Clarendon Press.

Austin W., & Susmilch C. ( 1974). Comment on Lane and Messe's confusing clarification of equity theory. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 30, 400-404.

Bernstein M., & Crosby F. ( 1980). An empirical examination of relative deprivation. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 16, 442-456.

Bies R. J. (in press). The predicament of injustice: Coping with moral outrage. In L. L. Cummings & B. M. Staw (Eds.), Research in organizational behavior (Vol. 9). Greenwich, CT: JAI Press.

Brickman P., Folger R., Schul Y., & Goode E. ( 1981). Microjustice and macrojustice. In M. J. Lerner & S. C. Lerner (Eds.), The justice motive in social behavior: Adapting to times of scarcity and change (pp. 173-202). New York: Plenum.

Cook T. D., & Campbell D. T. ( 1979). Quasi-experimentation: Design & analysis issues for field settings. Chicago: Rand-McNally.

Cook T. D., Crosby F., & Hennigan K. M. ( 1977). The construct validity of relative deprivation. In J. Suls & R. Miller (Eds.), Social comparison processes (pp. 307-333). New York: Halsted/Wiley.

Crosby F. ( 1976). A model of egoistical relative deprivation. Psychological Review, 83, 85- 113.

Crosby F. ( 1982). Relative deprivation and working women. New York: Oxford University Press.

Einhorn H. L., & Hogarth R. M. ( 1982). Prediction, diagnosis, and causal thinking in forecasting. Journal of Forecasting, 1, 23-36.

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