Psychologist at Large: An Autobiography and Selected Essays

By Edwin G. Boring | Go to book overview

The Woman Problem
1951

During the Second World War Alice I. Bryan and I were members of R. M. Yerkes' Survey and Planning Committee, which met for several days at a time and discussed ways in which psychology might contribute to America's war effort. Personal matters kept coming up and Dr. Bryan and I soon found that we disagreed about the feminist problem, or at least about what you should actually do to be fair to women. I then had the idea—which I now know to be impractical—that honest intelligent persons who disagree should always by intimate discussion either come into agreement or become aware of the nature of the a priori values that separate them. For this reason I suggested to Dr. Bryan that she and I collaborate on a study of the status of American women psychologists. We published three joint papers under the general title "Women in American Psychology" (Psychological Bulletin, 1944, vol. 41, 447-454; American Psychologist, 1946, vol. 1, 71-79; 1947, vol. 2, 3-20) and we even got a prize for a summary of this work, but we did not reshape our values into a single pattern, and, when we faced admonitory conclusions, we had to compromise or retreat to description of fact. My plan had not worked. Four years later I thought: Let me write the truth now just as I see it. It will do me good, my own personal uncompromised "truth." Here it is.

Dr. Mildred B. Mitchell (1951) has pointed out that women do not hold administrative and honorific positions in the APA

____________________
Reprinted with permission from the American Psychologist, 1951, vol. 6, 679-682.

-185-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Psychologist at Large: An Autobiography and Selected Essays
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 371

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.