9. Is a Communist World Empire Desirable?

IT IS HARD for ordinary citizens to realize that there are in the United States, as in every other nation, thousands, even hundreds of thousands, of persons who believe that a communist World Empire is not merely possible but good. Some of them work actively for that Empire; others would welcome it; many more are prepared to accept it, if it comes. They believe that it would be what they would call "the solution."

On one point they are undoubtedly wiser than the rest. They see that the question of communist world rule is an issue which must be faced, about which a moral being ought to make a deliberate and plain decision. The communist World Empire is a part, the culminating part, not of the myth of communism, but of its blunt reality. It is not the vague possibility of a remotely future century, but a quite probable outcome for the present generation. What, then, is our moral ballot: For or Against? Is a communist World Empire desirable?

Such a question is always more complex than it appears. When we ask whether something is desirable, we must always presuppose certain assumptions in order that the question should be meaningful: desirable for whom, in relation to what standards, and in comparison to what possible alternatives? Even the Anopheles mosquito is desirable, if our standard is the ability to spread malaria.

Naturally, a communist victory is thought to be desirable by the communist leadership which would share in and benefit by that victory. Our reference must be to the majority of men, which is not communist.

This book has made its point of departure the problem of atomic weapons, taken in the historical context of the present stage in the development of civilizations. A basic conclusion was reached that only a monopoly of atomic weapons, which could be exercised only by what would be in effect a World Empire, could save Western

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