Social Networks of Children, Adolescents, and College Students

By Suzanne Salzinger; John Antrobus et al. | Go to book overview

language and concerned with problems that we all acknowledge to be important issues in the field. A number of themes are touched upon -- the description of children's networks and their variation with age and with ecological context, the problems of measurement, and the functional relationships of children's networks to various important aspects of development.

It is our hope in collecting this research in one place not only that it will serve as a source of information about children's social networks and as an aid in understanding their implications but also that it will act as a catalyst for inspiring other investigators to begin to work in the area -- resulting in research that we believe will eventually help improve children's lives through the added understanding of the effects of the social context in which they grow up.


REFERENCES

Abramovitch R., Corter C., & Lando B. ( 1979). Sibling interaction in the home. Child Development, 50, 997-1,003

Asher S. R.SS, & Gottman J. M. (Eds.). ( 1981). The development of children's friendships Cambridge: Cambridge University Press

Berkman L. F. ( 1984). Assessing the physical health effects of social networks and social support. Annual Review of Public Health, 5, 413-432

Bernard H. R., Killworth P. D., & Sailer L. ( 1980). Informant accuracy in social network data IV. Social Networks, 2, 191-218

Berndt T. J. ( 1979). Development changes in conformity to peers and parents. Developmental Psychology, 15, 608-616

Cassel J. ( 1976). The contribution of the social environment to host resistance. American Journal of Epidemiology, 104, 107-123

Coie J. D., Dodge K. A., & Coppotelli H. ( 1982). Dimensions and types of social status: A cross-age perspective. Developmental Psychology, 18, 557-570

Coie J. D., & Kupersmidt J. B. ( 1983). A behavioral analysis of emerging social status in boys' groups. Child Development, 54, 1, 400-1, 416

Cowen E. L., Pederson A., Babigian H., Izzo L. D., & Trost M. A. ( 1973). Long-term follow-up of early detected vulnerable children. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 41, 438-446

Dodge K. A. ( 1983). Behavioral antecedents of peer social status. Child Development, 54, 1, 386-1, 399

Ellis S., Rogoff B., & Cromer C. C. ( 1981). Age segregation in children's social interactions Developmental Psychology, 17, 399-407

Garbarino J., Sebes J., & Schellenbach C. ( 1984). Families at risk for destructive parentchild relations in adolescence. Child Development, 55, 174-183

Gold D., & Andreas D. ( 1978). Developmental comparison between ten-year-old children with employed and unemployed mothers. Child Development, 49, 75-84

Gottman J. M., & Parkhurst J. T. ( 1980). A developmental theory of friendship and acquaintanceship processes. In W. A. Collins (Ed.), Development of cognition, affect, and social relations. The Minnesota symposia on child psychology, Vol. 13. Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum. Associates.

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