14. The Supreme Object of United States
Policy: Defensive

WE SEEK, THEN, to formulate a policy which the United States could follow, and which would be adequate to the demands of the present world political crisis. Though it might be phrased in a variety of ways, there is only one such policy. I shall restrict the present chapter to a statement of the negative or defensive phase of the policy, and reserve the positive or offensive phase for the next chapter. This separation is somewhat arbitrary. Defensive and offensive measures are, after all, only differing tactical applications of a single general strategy. However, the distinction is useful for analysis and exposition.

The nature of a defensive policy is not an independent problem. A proper defense is derivative from the policy of the opponent, and is designed to block the fulfillment of that policy. If, therefore, we have discovered the opponent's policy, we have thereby indirectly learned also the objective of defense. Carrying out the defense may be difficult in practice, or even impossible, but we will at least have the great advantage of knowing what we are trying to do. If our vegetables are under attack from woodchucks, a fence around the garden will be a suitable protection. If the attack is from insects or birds, however, the fence will be irrelevant.

For the United States, we know that the opponent is world communism. We know that the ultimate communist aim is a communist World Empire. Therefore, the general defensive goal of United States policy must be to prevent the fulfillment of that aim. In Chapter 7, we saw that this communist policy, in this present period which they interpret as the period of preparation for the open stage of the Third World War, reduces to two specific tasks: consolidation of effective domination of Eurasia, and the infiltration and

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