15. The Supreme Object of United States Policy: Offensive

DEFENSIVE STRATEGY, because it is negative, is never enough. The defensive policy stated in the preceding chapter would be able to halt and even reverse, for a time, the communist Eurasian advance. It would make more difficult the communists' path toward their final goal, and would delay their arrival. Communist victory would, however, still be the end result.

The trouble with a merely defensive policy is that, however successfully pursued, it leaves unsolved the problems which generate the crisis in world politics. The intolerable unbalance of world political forces would remain. There would be no framework within which the world polity could function without continuous irritation.

The irrepressible issue between world communism, with its unalterable aim of world conquest, and the non-communist world would not be settled. Civilization would continue to be under the ceaseless threat of destruction by atomic warfare.

Under these circumstances, any retreat of the communists would prove temporary. Since they have a plan which, no matter how costly to human values, would at any rate sufficiently work, men would in desperation turn toward that plan as the only answer offered to an unendurable challenge. If there is no alternative, there can be no doubt about the choice.

The communist plan for the solution of the world crisis is the World Federation of Socialist Soviet Republics: that is, the communist World Empire. If the communists are not to win, there must be presented to the governments and the peoples of the world a positive alternative to the communist plan, which will meet, at least as well as the communist plan, the demands of the crisis. Mankind will not accept, as a substitute for the communist Empire, nothing.

This alternative can only be another, a non-communist World

-181-

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