Schooling Students Placed at Risk: Research, Policy, and Practice in the Education of Poor and Minority Adolescents

By Mavis G. Sanders | Go to book overview

present clear and consistent evidence of the benefits of higher SES families' social networks, together with direct parental involvement in school, on postsecondary enrollment. However, according to the counselors, school, family, and community connections were weak in the schools we visited, and they are generally lacking in comprehensive high schools throughout the district. Although there was widespread agreement among counselors that parents and communities can be invaluable allies for schools, real-world constraints such as logistics, poor communication between families and school staff, and lack of resources impede the degree to which linkages are formed and cemented. Weak school, family, and community connections may be especially disadvantageous for students attending comprehensive high schools in the district. Because of the concentration of poverty and the small proportion of parents who have attended college, the amount of information about postsecondary opportunities, and thus, the guidance, families are able to provide their adolescents without assistance is limited. It seems certain that to break the cycle of educational failure and talent loss, and to help open the doors to higher education for at-risk students, strong interventions that unify parents, schools, and communities for the sake of the students must be established and maintained.


REFERENCES

Coleman J. S. ( 1988). Social capital in the creation of human capital. American Journal of Sociology, 94 (Suppl.), S95-S120.

Epstein J. L. ( 1995). School/family/community partnerships: Caring for the children we share. Phi Delta Kappan, 76(9), 701-712.

Hanson S. L. ( 1994). Lost talent: Unrealized educational aspirations and expectations among U.S. youths. Sociology of Education, 67(3), 159-183.

Manski C. F., & Wise D. A. ( 1983). College choice in America. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

National Center for Educational Statistics. ( 1988). National educational longitudinal study of 1988. Washington, DC: Author.

Plank S. B., & Jordan W. J. ( 1996). Reducing talent Loss: The impact of information, guidance, and actions on postsecondary enrollment (CRESPAR Rep. 9). Baltimore, MD, and Washington, DC: Center for Research on the Education of Students Placed at Risk..

Stanton-Salazar R. D., & Dornbusch S. M. ( 1995). Social capital and the reproduction of inequality: Information networks among Mexican-origin high school students. Sociology of Education, 68(2), 116-135.

U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare ( 1969). Toward a Social Report. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office.

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