Distinguished Asian Americans: A Biographical Dictionary

By Hyung-Chan Kim; Dorothy Cordova et al. | Go to book overview

CHARLES B. WANG

(1944–)

Entrepreneur, Business Leader

Charles B. Wang has made a reputation in America as a shrewd businessman. In a computer industry known for creativity and individualism, he has found a way to bring together different businesses to form one of this nation’s most formidable software giants.

Charles B. Wang was born in Shanghai, China, on August 19, 1944. His father had been a supreme court justice in China, but he brought his family to the United States in 1952 and became a law professor at St. John’s University. Charles Wang was raised in New York with his two brothers. Working his way through college, he graduated from Queens College with a Bachelor’s degree in mathematics in 1967. Noticing in a newspaper that advertisements for computer programmers were the most numerous, he decided to enter that field.

The Columbia University Electronics Lab hired Wang as a trainee in programming. Four years later he joined the Standard Data Corporation and worked in a department that provided software support for IBM mainframes for company clients. In 1976 he bought out Standard Data Corporation’s software division and formed Computer Associates International, Inc. (CA). Knowing about a Swiss software company’s desire to market its application program in the United States, Wang entered an arrangement that was satisfactory to both. He would have rights to the program in the United States, and in exchange the Swiss company would have an interest in Computer Associates. The arrangement worked out well, and several years later, in 1981, the firm went public.

Wang continued to employ the strategy of exchanging stock to purchase software companies. In selecting software companies, he always focused on the practical fit of their applications to business and to his production line. He aggressively implemented this strategy and rapidly acquired other firms. All the while, he kept his eye on serving corporate clients who had purchased various hardware systems at different times and later faced the problem of integrating into labor technologies through relevant software. Competitors often found that he was quick to exploit their weaknesses and seize the opportunity to buy them out if they could strengthen his line offerings or business position. He prefers

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Distinguished Asian Americans: A Biographical Dictionary
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Preface i
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Introduction xiii
  • Kyutaro Abiko 1
  • John Fugue Aiso 15
  • Chang Apana 18
  • Thang Nguyen Barrett 28
  • Benjamin J. Cayetano 37
  • Boona Cheema 52
  • Nna Chen Chennault 55
  • Connie Chung 76
  • Victoria Manalo Draves 89
  • Bobby Enriquez 94
  • March Fong Eu 97
  • Soon Hyun 130
  • Lawson Fusao Inada 134
  • Maxine Hong Kingston 164
  • Michelle Kwan 172
  • Genevieve (Genny) Lim 192
  • John Keun Lim 196
  • Daniel S. C. Liu 200
  • Benjamin Menor 238
  • Patsy Takemoto Mink 246
  • Hiroshi H. Miyamura 252
  • Ronald Tai Young Moon 256
  • Toshio Mori 258
  • Josie Cruz Natori 262
  • Isamu Noguchi 266
  • Soon Tek Oh 270
  • Vincent H. Okamoto 273
  • James Matsumoto Omura 278
  • Safi U. Qureshy 295
  • Robert Santos 310
  • George Shima 316
  • Paull Hobom Shin 318
  • Sichan Siv 322
  • Stanley Sue 328
  • Amy Tan 335
  • Togo William Tanaka 337
  • Chang Lin Tien 339
  • Edison Uno 343
  • Charles B. Wang 345
  • Jade Snow Wong 355
  • Appendix A - Fields of Professional Activity 373
  • Appendix B - Ethnic Subgroups 389
  • Index 395
  • Editors 429
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