Perspectives on the Grateful Dead: Critical Writings

By Robert G. Weiner | Go to book overview

Is There a Day of the Month Effect in ‘‘Beat It On Down the Line’’?

Robert K. Toutkoushian


INTRODUCTION

During the band’s thirty years on the American music scene, the Grateful Dead became well-known for its ability to improvise during live performances. While many of the band’s contemporaries relied on carefully scripted set lists for concerts, and rarely changed the way in which they played individual songs in concert, a Grateful Dead show was viewed by fans as being anything but scripted. The band made a practice of not only changing the songs played during performances, but also varying the order and manner in which selected songs were played. The variety inherent in all Grateful Dead performances most certainly contributed in part to the devoted following among its fans and their seemingly insatiable taste for attending and recording live performances.

To many fans, these improvisations seemed to occur with little rhyme or reason. Other fans quickly observed that in a strict sense, some of the decisions made by the band were not random, in that patterns emerged from performances. While the Grateful Dead changed set lists from show to show, they made a practice of frequently playing particular songs in combinations. Fans soon learned, for example, that if the band began to play the song ‘‘China Cat Sunflower,’’ the probability that it would be followed by ‘‘I Know You Rider’’ greatly exceeded what would be expected if all songs were chosen at random. Other examples where the notion of randomness was violated include the fact that certain songs were more likely to be played by the band in the first set than in the second set, and that a song sung by Jerry Garcia was more likely to be followed by a song sung by Bob Weir.

Fans have gone to great extremes in an effort to understand and uncover

-101-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Perspectives on the Grateful Dead: Critical Writings
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 245

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.