Perspectives on the Grateful Dead: Critical Writings

By Robert G. Weiner | Go to book overview

The Grateful Dead Experience: A Factor Analytic Study of the Personalities of People Who Identify with the Grateful Dead

William McCownandWendy Dulaney


INTRODUCTION TO PERSONALITY FROM THE TRAIT PERSPECTIVE

Since Plato’s Republic, music has long been recognized to have a profound influence on behavior (Goldron; Nettl). For example, it is now known that music produces specific and unique neural patterns, including specific alterations in brain waves (Rideout and Laubach). Rock music is no exception in its profound influence (Gracyk). It is likely that specific personality traits are more apt to be attracted to specific types of music (McCown, Keiser, Mulhearn, and Williamson). However, there is very little research in this area. Only recently are behavioral scientists beginning to ask if specific personality characteristics are associated with certain varieties of music, including rock.

What characterizes people who identify with the Grateful Dead? Is there any uniformity in their personalities? Anecdotal accounts abound. The popular media suggests that the Deadheads are a fairly dysfunctional, motley group, essentially living a bacchanalian, perhaps even nomadic or sociopathic, existence (Greenfield; Will). In fact, in an influential, though grossly exaggerated, paper based on clinical observation of drug-overdose subjects, Deadheads were characterized in an exceedingly negative manner (Millman and Beeder).

These descriptors are at odds with the experiences of many Grateful Dead fans, who appear to be a happy, compassionate, and psychologically stable group (Scully and Dalton). Speculation regarding personality factors of people who have had what can best be labeled the Grateful Dead experience (GDE)—an intense identification with the group and subsequent deep enjoyment of its music—is probably insufficient for an adequate understand-

-113-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Perspectives on the Grateful Dead: Critical Writings
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 245

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.