The History of Turkey

By Frank W. Thackeray; John E. Findling et al. | Go to book overview

8

Multiparty Democracy, 1945–1960

Like the characters in Yaşar Kemal’s novel Memed, My Hawk, the ordinary people of Turkey’s 40,000 villages experienced the revolutionary changes of the 1920s and 1930s indirectly at first, by way of the traditional institutions and relationships of their village. Published in 1955 and translated into dozens of languages in the years following, Memed, My Hawk tells the story of Slim Memed, a young boy who rebels against the cruelty of the village chief, Abdi Agha. After wounding Abdi Agha and killing his nephew in a violent confrontation, Memed flees to the hills to become a bandit.

Yaşar Kemal used archetypal characters, a common human moral sense, and symbolic imagery in Memed, My Hawk to create a story of epic reach. The horizons of his characters’ world, however, did not extend much beyond the fields and pastures surrounding their home village, located in a small plateau in the Çukurova plain. When on Memed’s first visit to a nearby town he meets an old man who describes Maraş to him and who has seen Istanbul, Memed thinks it a fantastic thing. The world is big, Memed realizes, and his village seems suddenly to be “but a spot in his mind’s eye,” and Abdi Agha “just an ant.” Excited by this vision, Memed seeks both personal revenge against Abdi Agha and an uncom-

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The History of Turkey
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Preface xiii
  • Preface xv
  • Preface xxi
  • 1 - Turkey Today 1
  • 2 - Ancient Anatolia 23
  • 3 - The Turkish Conquest of Anatolia, 1071–1517 31
  • 4 - Anatolia and the Classical Ottoman System, 1517–1789 43
  • 5 - The Late Ottoman Empire, 1789–1908 55
  • 6 - Revolution and War, 1908–1923 73
  • 7 - The Early Turkish Republic, 1923–1945 91
  • 8 - Multiparty Democracy, 1945–1960 115
  • 9 - Military Intervention and the Second Republic, 1960–1980 133
  • 10 - The Military Republic, 1980–1993 157
  • 11 - Turkey after öZal 175
  • Notable People in the History of Turkey 187
  • Glossary 203
  • Bibliographic Essay 213
  • Index 223
  • About the Author 243
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