Food: A Dictionary of Literal and Nonliteral Terms

By Robert A. Palmatier | Go to book overview

M

MACARONI

a Macaroni. A “fop”; a “dandy.” BDPF: ca. 1760. Source: MACARONI. MWCD: 1599. The “foppish” young “dandies” of the mid-18th cent. Macaroni Club in London were named for the club itself, which was named after a food that represented one of the club’s Continental interests: Italy, along with its macaroni, wine, women, and song. The upper-crust young Macaronis were not well respected in England; consequently, when the word appeared in the song “Yankee Doodle Dandy” during the American Revolution, it was difficult to tell whether the sarcasm was directed at a foppish young British soldier or a dandy young American one. (However, one American regiment was called the “Macaronies” because of their natty uniforms.) At any rate, the song, whether of British or American origin, is now associated with American soldiers during the Revolutionary War, and the word Yankee has progressively meant a New Englander, a Northeasterner, an American, and a member of the New York City American League baseball team: the Yankees. The song goes as follows: “Yankee Doodle went to town / Riding on a pony; / He stuck a feather in his cap / And called it macaroni” [italics added]. As a food, macaroni covers a broad category of pastas that are tube-shaped (such as the elbow macaroni that is used for macaroni and cheese), shell-shaped, twisted, and shaped in many other forms. Macaroni salad is a cold dish combining shaped macaroni with various vegetables and seasonings. The macaroni penguin (NSOED: mid-19th cent.) is so called because it has stringy yellow feathers hanging from its head. DAFD; EWPO; FLC; HDAS; LCRH.


MACARONIC VERSE

Verse containing a mixture of words from two languages. MWCD: 1638. Source: MACARONI. MWCD: 1599. Macaronic verse is so called because it resembles a dish of macaroni mixed with vegetables, meats, sauces, and condiments. This type of verse was named, as one might expect, by

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Food: A Dictionary of Literal and Nonliteral Terms
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Preface xi
  • Abbreviations and Symbols xiii
  • A 1
  • B 13
  • C 47
  • D 95
  • E 110
  • F 123
  • G 148
  • H 166
  • I 187
  • J 196
  • K 201
  • L 207
  • M 224
  • N 249
  • O 256
  • P 264
  • Q 296
  • R 297
  • S 307
  • T 356
  • U 378
  • V 380
  • W 384
  • Y 394
  • Z 399
  • About the Author 463
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