Food: A Dictionary of Literal and Nonliteral Terms

By Robert A. Palmatier | Go to book overview

V

VALENCIA ORANGE

See Orange.


VANILLA

See Plain-vanilla.


VANTAGE LOAF

See Baker’s Dozen.


VARIETY IS THE SPICE OF LIFE

Diversity is what makes life interesting. HND: 1785. (From a poem, “The Task,” by William Cowper: “Variety’s the very spice of life, / That gives it all its flavour.”) Source: SPICE. MWCD: 13th cent. Spice is what makes food interesting: It seasons it, flavors it, colors it, and even perfumes it. Unlike herbs, which come from the leaves of plants, spices come from the roots (e.g., ginger), bark (e.g., cinnamon), seeds (e.g., nutmeg), buds (e.g., cloves), pods (e.g., paprika), and even stigmas (e.g., saffron) of plants. Just as turmeric “spices up” mustard and gives it its yellow color, a change in scenery can spice up a person’s life, adding zest and spirit. Meatballs flavored with sage, an herb, are considered spicy (MWCD: 1562); and gossip flavored with scandal is considered spicy as well. CE; CI; CODP; DAP; FLC; HF; NSOED. See also Sugar and Spice and Everything Nice.


VARIETY MEATS

The edible parts of mammals other than the skeletal meat. MWCD: ca. 1946. Source: MEAT. MWCD: O.E. Variety meats are of two types: organs (such as brains, heart, kidneys, liver, pancreas, stomach, and thymus) and extremities (such as ankles, feet, lips, tail, and tongue). Variety meats is a euphemism for meat by-products, which includes everything other than muscle and fat (i.e., flesh). Another euphemism is specialty meats, which consists of skeletal meat and (optional) extremity meats ground up fine, baked or boiled, formed into

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Food: A Dictionary of Literal and Nonliteral Terms
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Preface xi
  • Abbreviations and Symbols xiii
  • A 1
  • B 13
  • C 47
  • D 95
  • E 110
  • F 123
  • G 148
  • H 166
  • I 187
  • J 196
  • K 201
  • L 207
  • M 224
  • N 249
  • O 256
  • P 264
  • Q 296
  • R 297
  • S 307
  • T 356
  • U 378
  • V 380
  • W 384
  • Y 394
  • Z 399
  • About the Author 463
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