Drugs and Money: Laundering Latin America's Cocaine Dollars

By Robert E. Grosse | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

I would like to thank the many people who contributed to the development of this book. I cannot include all of them, some because of necessary anonymity and others because I cannot recall all of their contributions. I apologize to those whom I have left out. Undoubtedly, the initiating forces behind my work in this area were Bruce Bagley, Colombia expert and protagonist in the country’s efforts to deal with the drug problem, and Lynn Summers, both of whom invited me to participate in analyses of economic aspects of narcotics trafficking and money laundering.

Next, I would like to thank the several student assistants who worked with me in tracking down articles, books, and government documents on these subjects. They include Michael Crowe, Kumar Venkataramany, Steve Bettink, Pari Thirunavukkarasu, and others at Thunderbird and at the University of Miami. I would especially like to thank Georgia Lessard of the Thunderbird presentation graphics department for her superb work in creating the figures and tables in this book.

For the most part, I cannot explicitly recognize those who provided me with information about money laundering schemes from the law enforcement community and from the launderers themselves. Since they know who they are, I simply express my appreciation for their insights and willingness to share information. I can mention a couple of them by name, and through them thank the rest implicitly. Mike McDonald, formerly of the IRS Criminal Investigation Division in Miami, regaled me with many stories of amazing money laundering schemes, some of which appear in these pages; and Charles Intriago, editor of the newsletter Money Laundering Alert, provided me on several occasions with access to useful documents and an interpretation of government regulations and policies. Quite a few Colombian bankers and businesspeople helped me to understand the laundering processes, but due to concern for their personal safety I cannot mention their names here.

-vii-

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