Fixing the Spy Machine: Preparing American Intelligence for the Twenty-First Century

By Richard R. Valcourt; Arthur S. Hulnick | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

As usual in works of this sort, I owe a debt of gratitude to many people who helped me and encouraged me in writing this book. Special thanks go to Deborah and Richard Valcourt of New York City because it was over a lovely dinner at one of Richard’s favorite Manhattan restaurants that the two of them first kindled the idea of writing this book, pushed me to come up with a plan for it and even a title. Thanks also to Richard for finding a publisher and preparing the foreword. As managing editor and later editor-in-chief of the International Journal of Intelligence and CounterIntelligence, Richard has published a number of my articles, thus laying the groundwork for this book.

My wife Eileen and my daughter Sandra were helpful in providing patient but consistent support whenever my enthusiasm for the project waned, but it was my younger daughter Larisa who gave me specific help in editing the original manuscript, questioning my occasionally vague writing, and providing useful suggestions over the two years it took to get this book done.

My graduate assistant during the last year of the project, Lisa Sasson, helped me track down some of the source materials I needed and helped me put the bibliography together. I was able to obtain other useful data from the electronic notes sent out by the Association of Former Intelligence Officers (AFIO), an organization of which I am an active member.

I am grateful to the folks at Greenwood Publishing for deciding to publish the book, especially Dr. Heather Ruland Staines, the history editor, who first took an interest in the manuscript, and the others, some of whom I don’t know, who prepared the copy and readied the book for printing, including Nicole Cournoyer and Bridget Austiguy-Preschel.

My former colleagues at the Central Intelligence Agency have helped

-xvii-

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Fixing the Spy Machine: Preparing American Intelligence for the Twenty-First Century
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents ix
  • Foreword xi
  • Acknowledgments xvii
  • Acronyms xix
  • Chapter 1 - Is the Spy Machine Broken? 1
  • Chapter 2 - Stealing the Secrets 23
  • Chapter 3 - Puzzles and Mysteries 43
  • Chapter 4 - Secret Operations 63
  • Chapter 5 - Catching the Enemy’s Spies 87
  • Chapter 6 - Stopping the Bad Guys 105
  • Chapter 7 - Managing and Controlling Secret Intelligence 129
  • Chapter 8 - Spying for Profit 151
  • Chapter 9 - Secret Intelligence and the Public 173
  • Chapter 10 - Fixing the Spy Machine 191
  • Bibliography 209
  • Index 217
  • About the Author 223
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