Fixing the Spy Machine: Preparing American Intelligence for the Twenty-First Century

By Richard R. Valcourt; Arthur S. Hulnick | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 5

Catching the Enemy’s Spies

It stands to reason that if the United States is running espionage operations against other countries, those same countries may be spying on the United States. Of course, if the United States is carrying out espionage, it is only because it is necessary for national security, it is accepted as a part of international practice, and there is no alternative for self-defense. If, however, other countries run espionage operations against the United States, they are seen to be evil, they must be violating international law, and they must be stopped. Counterintelligence (CI)—the business of catching enemy spies—has long been a part of the intelligence world and has deep roots in the United States. Today countering espionage is just one part of counterintelligence, which now may include countering terrorism, narcotics trafficking, or global crimes. We can examine these other threats later, but we should begin by looking at the system designed to stop espionage by other intelligence services.

George Washington understood very well the uses of espionage against the British, but the Colonials were chagrined and frustrated to discover that they were ill-prepared to take action against British spies who penetrated their army and their government. One of the first spies the British used against the upstart Americans was Dr. Benjamin Church, the surgeon general of the American Army. 1 It was Church who had leaked information about the weapons held by the colonial militias in Lexington and Concord. It was no wonder that the British seemed to know so much about the plans of the revolutionaries in and around Boston. Church was the “mole.” When the good doctor was discovered after his mistress gave an encoded letter from Church to an acquaintance

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Fixing the Spy Machine: Preparing American Intelligence for the Twenty-First Century
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents ix
  • Foreword xi
  • Acknowledgments xvii
  • Acronyms xix
  • Chapter 1 - Is the Spy Machine Broken? 1
  • Chapter 2 - Stealing the Secrets 23
  • Chapter 3 - Puzzles and Mysteries 43
  • Chapter 4 - Secret Operations 63
  • Chapter 5 - Catching the Enemy’s Spies 87
  • Chapter 6 - Stopping the Bad Guys 105
  • Chapter 7 - Managing and Controlling Secret Intelligence 129
  • Chapter 8 - Spying for Profit 151
  • Chapter 9 - Secret Intelligence and the Public 173
  • Chapter 10 - Fixing the Spy Machine 191
  • Bibliography 209
  • Index 217
  • About the Author 223
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