Making Space: Merging Theory and Practice in Adult Education

By Vanessa Sheared; Peggy A. Sissel et al. | Go to book overview

Part IV

Cultural Infusion: Reflections on Identity and Practice

Just who are we, and how does this knowledge of self affect or influence what we do? Through a very thoughtful exploration of themselves and their “lifework,” the authors in Part IV of Making Space provide us with a glimpse of the ways in which their racial/ethnic, language, gender, and sexual orientation have helped shape their identities. Not only do they offer their life stories, but they share with us the ways in which their individual identities have challenged and shaped their thinking about their practice and lifework. For these authors, it appears that their lifework is an interweaving of who they are, what they call themselves, and what they do, or, as Bingman and White suggest in Chapter 11: “where we live, the way we talk, and the way we feel are highly interconnected,” and interwoven with how one operates within one’s local and global community—that is, within one’s personal life and across borders. Moreover, they challenge us to think about staying in the margins as a way to not only challenge those in the center, but as a way to obtain and maintain power and authority over one’s story, socioeconomics, politics, and culture.

This section begins with an examination by Brown of life stories and lifework of African-American women teachers in Chapter 15. Through the use of an Africentric feminist analysis, Brown explores the life stories of two African-American women teachers, as well as her own life story as a teacher. In spite of the adversities in these women’s lives, and being treated differently by their students as a result of their race, gender, and class, these women have overcome the difficulties and have been able to impart to their students a spirit and desire for learning. By giving voice to the life histories and lived experiences of these women, Brown hopes to “challenge the myths and untruths established about African Americans and African American women,” teachers and learners in particular. Through her voice, as well as that of Septima Clark and bell hooks, we begin to see the ways in which one’s identity and understanding of it helps shape or influence one’s practice. In the case of African-American women, the

-209-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Making Space: Merging Theory and Practice in Adult Education
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 359

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.