Managers, Part of the Problem? Changing How the Public Sector Works

By Camaron J. Thomas | Go to book overview

Chapter 12

Epilogue: Manage by Example

It would be nice if organizations supported Core Management. Certainly the issues we face in the future will demand greater collaboration and dialogue. Any organization that believes that it alone can manage a future policy problem, like genetic engineering, will hurt all of us.

It would also be nice if organizations learned to reward real positive change. A monetary reward system, for example, that pays us “x” for achieving our personal goals and an additional “y” for achieving stipulated group goals would be a start. Reward systems beyond the traditional ones need attention, too—rewards like having one’s choice of assignments, the opportunity to rotate among agencies, or the chance to work at home.

But organizations usually change in reaction to a crisis. We’ve already learned Core Management isn’t going to be implemented. It will evolve. And we’ve got everything we need right now to begin the transition as each of us learns to manage—and live—with respect for self, toward others, and for the public.

Managing with respect is the intention behind the final principle of Core Management, which is that Core Management begins and ends with individuals. Managing with respect requires an ongoing process of self-examination, reviewing our motivations, needs, and experiences. It requires a personal constitution, predicated on self-trust, individual responsibility, and personal initiative. Into this soil, we can now sow some practical steps.

A Core Manager listens. He or she starts with an issue. He or she convenes a work group, involves stakeholders, and relies on outsid-

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