The Great Frontier War: Britain, France, and the Imperial Struggle for North America, 1607-1755

By William R. Nester | Go to book overview

1

Trade and Conquest

He that commaundes the sea commaundes the trade, & he that is the lord of the trade of the worlde is lord of the wealth of the worlde.

—Sir Walter Raleigh, 1600

That, notwithstanding the Grants of the Kings of England, France, or Spain, the Property of these uninhabited Parts of the World must be founded upon prior Occupancy according to the Law of Nature; and it is the Seating and Cultivating of the soil & not the bare travelling through a Territory that constitutes Right.

—Lewis Burwell, 1750

I have not reply to make to your general other than from the mouths of my cannon and muskets!

—Governor Louis de Baude Frontenac’s reply to Sir William Phips’ surrender demand, 1691

For over a century and a half, the French and English struggled to carve ever larger empires from the North American wilderness between the Atlantic Ocean, Rocky Mountains, Gulf of Mexico, and Hudson Bay. At first they faced not only each other but also the Spanish, Dutch and, briefly, the Swedes. Bloodshed was nearly incessant as these European powers battled among themselves and, more decisively, each fought a series of wars against various Indian tribes to establish and expand their footholds on the continent. In three mid-17th-century wars, the English defeated the Dutch (who had earlier absorbed the few Swedish settlements) and took over their North American holdings. Separately, the French and English stymied Spanish am-

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Great Frontier War: Britain, France, and the Imperial Struggle for North America, 1607-1755
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • 1 - Trade and Conquest 1
  • 2 - Economies and Societies 53
  • 3 - Armies and Navies 109
  • 4 - 1754 175
  • 5 - 1755 217
  • Bibliography 275
  • Index 315
  • About the Author 327
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 327

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.