American Slavery, American Freedom: The Ordeal of Colonial Virginia

By Edmund S. Morgan | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

This book has been a good many years in the making, and many people have helped me to write it. Helen M. Morgan, as always, has helped much more than anyone else. She has worked with me from the beginning, and every draft of every chapter has had the benefit of her critical scrutiny. If the final result has any clarity of thought or expression, it is because of her patience and perception.

Parts of the book, in a different form, were delivered as the Commonwealth Lectures at the University of London in 1970. Part of chapter 3 appeared in the American Historical Review in 1971 as "The Labor Problem at Jamestown, 1607-18"; parts of chapters 5 and 6 appeared in the same year in the William and Mary Quarterly as "The First American Boom, Virginia 1618 to 1630"; and I tried out some of the ideas in chapter 18 in "Slavery and Freedom: The American Paradox," in the Journal of American History in 1972. In these preliminary formulations I was able to benefit from the criticism of several colleagues and friends. F. J. Fisher, Jack Hexter, Peter Laslett, Lawrence Stone, and Joan Thirsk helped me to avoid some errors in what I have to say about English history. And I have profited in a variety of ways from discussions with Charles Boxer, John M. Blum, David B. Davis, William N. Parker, the late David Potter, and C. Vann Woodward.

For help in avoiding some of the pitfalls in compiling the statistical tables (I surely have not avoided all of them), I am grateful to a number of people: to John McCarthy and to Robert Luft for programming information for computer analysis, and to Lois Carr, Gloria Main, and Russell Menard, who read the first draft of the Appendix and gave valuable advice about it. I also wish to thank

-ix-

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American Slavery, American Freedom: The Ordeal of Colonial Virginia
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • American Slavery American Freedom - The Ordeal of Colonial Virginia *
  • Contents *
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Book I - The Promised Land *
  • 1 - Dreams of Liberation 3
  • 2 - The Lost Colony 25
  • 3 - Idle Indian and Lazy Englishman 44
  • 4 - The Jamestown Fiasco 71
  • 5 - The Persistent Vision 92
  • 6 - Boom 108
  • Book II - A New Deal *
  • 7 - Settling Down 133
  • 8 - Living with Death 158
  • 9 - The Trouble with Tobacco 180
  • 10 - A Golden Fleecing 196
  • Book III - The Volatile Society *
  • 11 - The Losers 215
  • 12 - Discontent 235
  • 13 - Rebellion 250
  • 14 - Status Quo 271
  • Book IV - Slavery and Freedom *
  • 15 - Toward Slavery 295
  • 16 - Toward Racism 316
  • 17 - Toward Populism 338
  • 18 - Toward the Republic 363
  • Footnote Abbreviations 389
  • Appendix - Population Growth in Seventeenth-Century Virginia 395
  • A Note on the Sources 433
  • Index 443
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