The Proudest Day: India's Long Road to Independence

By Anthony Read; David Fisher | Go to book overview

Contents
List of Illustrationsxi
Glossaryxii
Mapsxv
Acknowledgementsxxiii
Prologue I
1.
'In Quiet Trade' 10
2.
'The Strangest of all Empires' 27
3.
'The Moaning of the Hurricane' 45
4.
'The Mildest Form of Government is Despotism' 55
5.
'If Fifty Men Cannot be Found ...' 69
6.
'The Gravity of the Blunder' 83
7.
'No Bombs, No Boons' 102
8.
'A Spontaneous Loyalty' 114
9.
'An Indefensible System' 132
10.
'God Bless Gandhi' 142
11.
'A Himalayan Miscalculation' 162
12.
'The Very Brink of Chaos and Anarchy' 179
13.
'A Butchery of Our Souls' 197
14.
'A Year's Grace and a Polite Ultimatum' 211
15.
'A Mad Risk' 226
16.
'Civil Martial Law' 245
17.
'The Empty Fruits of Office' 260
18.
'The Congress Asked for Bread and it has Got a Stone' 277
19.
'A Landmark in the Future History of India' 293
20.
'A Post-dated Cheque on a Bank that is Failing' 310
21.
'Leave India to God - or to Anarchy' 325
22.
'The Two Great Mountains have Met — and not even a Ridiculous Mouse has Emerged' 341
23.
'Patriots not Traitors' 359

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The Proudest Day: India's Long Road to Independence
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Proudest Day - India's Long Road to Independence *
  • Contents *
  • List of Illustrations *
  • Glossary *
  • Maps *
  • Acknowledgements *
  • Prologue *
  • 1 - In Quiet Trade *
  • 2 *
  • 3 *
  • 4 *
  • 5 *
  • 6 *
  • 7 *
  • 8 *
  • 9 *
  • 10 *
  • 11 *
  • 12 *
  • 13 *
  • 14 *
  • 15 *
  • 16 *
  • 17 *
  • 18 *
  • 19 *
  • 20 *
  • 21 *
  • 22 *
  • 23 *
  • 24 *
  • 25 *
  • 26 *
  • 27 *
  • 28 *
  • 29 *
  • 30 *
  • Epilogue *
  • Source Notes *
  • Bibliography *
  • Index *
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