The Proudest Day: India's Long Road to Independence

By Anthony Read; David Fisher | Go to book overview

9
'An Indefensible System'

By the time of the Lucknow Pact, the mood of India was already changing. The war was dragging on longer than anyone had expected, and as the death toll mounted among the Indian volunteers, disillusionment grew. In his presidential speech at the League session, Jinnah had declared that the 'united India demand must eventually prove irresistible'. He had gone on to assure his listeners that when the war was won, 'India will have to be granted her birthright as a free, responsible and equal member of the British Empire.' But the British government was already showing signs that it did not agree with him.

There was to be an Imperial War Conference in 1917, to formulate policy both for the continuation of the war and for the peace afterwards. All the white dominions would participate as a matter of course. The Indians, who were contributing so much to the Allied cause, believed they had a right to be there, too. Hardinge pressed India's claim, which he thought was entirely just. But he was ignored by a war cabinet dominated by Curzon and Kitchener, with their bitter personal memories of India. Frustrated and weary, still suffering the after‐ effects of the 1912 bomb, and with all his efforts to liberalize the regime sabotaged by the die-hards in Delhi, Hardinge stepped down as viceroy in 1916, and returned to Britain.

Hardinge's successor as viceroy, Lord Chelmsford, did not inspire confidence. Although he was the grandson of a distinguished solicitor-general, attorney-general and ultimately lord chancellor, he had little else to recommend him. A polished but uninspiring former cavalry captain with little knowledge or understanding of India, his political career had not been distinguished. After serving as a member of the LCC, he had been governor first of Queensland and then of New South Wales, but was subsequently turned down for the governorship of Bombay. It has been suggested that the reason Prime Minister Asquith chose him to be viceroy was that he was the only fellow of All Souls in

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Proudest Day: India's Long Road to Independence
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Proudest Day - India's Long Road to Independence *
  • Contents *
  • List of Illustrations *
  • Glossary *
  • Maps *
  • Acknowledgements *
  • Prologue *
  • 1 - In Quiet Trade *
  • 2 *
  • 3 *
  • 4 *
  • 5 *
  • 6 *
  • 7 *
  • 8 *
  • 9 *
  • 10 *
  • 11 *
  • 12 *
  • 13 *
  • 14 *
  • 15 *
  • 16 *
  • 17 *
  • 18 *
  • 19 *
  • 20 *
  • 21 *
  • 22 *
  • 23 *
  • 24 *
  • 25 *
  • 26 *
  • 27 *
  • 28 *
  • 29 *
  • 30 *
  • Epilogue *
  • Source Notes *
  • Bibliography *
  • Index *
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 565

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.