The Domestic Assault of Women: Psychological and Criminal Justice Perspectives

By Donald G. Dutton | Go to book overview

1
History and Incidence of Wife Assault

How vast is the number of men, in any great country, who are a little higher than brutes ... This never prevents them from being able, through the laws of marriage, to obtain a victim ... The vilest malefactor has some wretched woman tied to him against whom he can commit any atrocity except killing her - and even that he can do without too much danger of legal penalty.

- John Stuart Mill, The Subjection of Women (1869)

Wife assault refers to any physical act of aggression by a man against a woman with whom he is in an intimate (i.e., sexual-emotional) relationship. Researchers (e.g., Schulman 1979; Straus 1979) typically define severe assault as actions with a relatively high likelihood of causing injury to the victim. Hence, kicking, biting, hitting with a fist or object, beating up, or using a weapon against a victim are all actions regarded as constituting severe assault. These actions are likely to carry medical consequences for the victim; and they are actions that, in practice, are considered grounds for arrest. Other assaultive acts (e.g., slapping, pushing, shoving, grabbing, throwing objects at the victim) are less likely to invoke medical or criminal justice consequences.

Some might object that this classification system does not pay enough attention to the effects of the actions it classifies. Shoving someone down a flight of stairs, for example, may have more serious consequences than hitting him or her with a rolled up newspaper. However, since we will be making use of research that has followed this convention of classifying violent acts (using the Straus Conflict Tactics Scale [CTS]), and since we wish to connect our understanding of the psychology of such actions to the criminal justice policy used to reduce their likelihood, we will use it throughout this book.

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Domestic Assault of Women: Psychological and Criminal Justice Perspectives
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 337

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.