Exegetic Homilies

By Saint Basil; Sister Agnes Clare C. D.P. Way | Go to book overview

HOMILY 21

A Psalm of David for Idithun and
a Body of Singers

(ON PSALM 61)

WE KNOW Two PSALMS with the title 'For Idithun,' the thirty-eighth and this one that we have at hand. And we think that the composition of the work is owed to David; that it was given to Idithun for his use that he might correct the passions of his soul, and also as a choral song to be sung in the presence of the people. Through it, also, God was glorified, and those who heard it amended their habits. Now, Idithun was a singer in the temple, as the history of the Paralipomenon testifies to us, saying: 'And after them Heman and Idithun sounded the trumpets and played on the cymbals and all kinds of musical instruments to sing praises to God.' 1 And a little later it says: 'Moreover David the king and the chief officers of the army separated for the ministry the sons of Asaph, and of Heman, and of Idithun: to prophesy with harps, and with psalteries, and with tympana.' 2

Both psalms treat, for the most part, of patience, through which the passions of the soul are reduced to order, all arrogance is banished, and humility is acquired. For, it is impossible for anyone who has not accepted the lowest and last place with respect to all, ever to be able, when abused, to

____________________
1
1 Par. 16.41, 42.
2
Ibid. 25.1.

-341-

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Exegetic Homilies
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Fathers of the Church - A New Translation *
  • The Fathers of the Church - A New Translation *
  • Exegetic Homilies *
  • Contents *
  • Introduction vii
  • Homily 1 3
  • Homily 2 21
  • Homily 3 37
  • Homily 4 55
  • Homily 5 67
  • Homily 6 83
  • Homily 7 105
  • Homily 8 117
  • Homily 9 135
  • Homily 10 151
  • Homily 11 165
  • Homily 12 181
  • Homily 13 193
  • Homily 14 213
  • Homily 15 227
  • Homily 16 247
  • Homily 17 275
  • Homily 18 297
  • Homily 19 311
  • Homily 20 333
  • Homily 21 341
  • Homily 22 351
  • Indices *
  • General Index 363
  • Index of Holy Scripture 375
  • The Fathers of the Church *
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