Handbook of Eating Disorders: Physiology, Psychology, and Treatment of Obesity, Anorexia, and Bulimia

By Kelly D. Brownell; John P. Foreyt | Go to book overview

13
Anorexia Nervosa : Medical
and Physiological Aspects

James E. Mitchell

Several important areas must be considered when examining the relationship between anorexia nervosa and physical status. The first is the well-recognized problem that certain medical illnesses can mimic primary anorexia nervosa. Space-occupying lesions of the central nervous system (CNS) represent one serious example. The second area concerns the medical complications of anorexia nervosa, some of which are serious. The third area concerns the pathophysiology of the disorder itself and centers on the question of whether the hypothalamic dysfunction seen in patients with anorexia nervosa is a cause or a consequence of the disorder. Is anorexia nervosa best considered a medical illness resulting from hypothalamic dysfunction that manifests itself in physical, psychological, and behavioral changes? Or does hypothalamic dysfunction result from the weight loss engendered by the psychopathology?

The first two considerations, medical causes and medical consequences, can be approached directly. The question of hypothalamic dysfunction remains a matter of considerable debate. This chapter reviews the physical causes and consequences of anorexia nervosa or anorexia-like illnesses and relates these findings to the question of causality.

Most of the physical abnormalities that have been demonstrated in anorexia nervosa patients have also been described in starved individuals who do not have anorexia nervosa. For example, the endocrine abnormalities of anorexia nervosa are similar to those of individuals undergoing starvation. * Experimental starvation research shows that many behavioral sequelae of anorexia nervosa, including irritability, difficulty with concentration, depression, mood lability, indecisiveness, and obsessive think

____________________
*
See references 11, 87, 126, 145, 146, and 154.

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Handbook of Eating Disorders: Physiology, Psychology, and Treatment of Obesity, Anorexia, and Bulimia
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 529

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.