Handbook of Eating Disorders: Physiology, Psychology, and Treatment of Obesity, Anorexia, and Bulimia

By Kelly D. Brownell; John P. Foreyt | Go to book overview

EPILOGUE
The Eating Disorders:
Summary and Integration

Kelly D. Brownell

John P. Foreyt


Has Our Mission Succeeded?

Our task of summarizing and integrating the chapters of this book is both exciting and challenging. A remarkable amount of information has been presented by the top people in the field. Individually, the chapters examine the important issues in obesity, anorexia, and bulimia. Collectively, what do they teach us?

The title of this volume captures our primary mission: the integration of physiology, psychology, and treatment. When we contacted prospective contributors for chapters, we were prepared to convince them of the conceptual and practical importance of this notion; little convincing was necessary. As is evident from the chapters, our contributors are expert in more than just the single area emphasized in their graduate or medical training. An interest in learning from other disciplines has spread among professionals in the eating disorders field and is reflected in the increasing tendency to assemble multidisciplinary teams for treatment. We hope this volume will foster this practice and that the product will be greater understanding of the physiological, psychological, and cultural causes of eating disorders, as well as their consequences, treatment, and prevention.

This notion of integration has obvious appeal to those involved with theory and research. We also wish to underscore the importance for practitioners. The treatment programs described in this volume consider the physiological, psychological, and cultural factors involved in the etiology and maintenance of the eating disorders. The implications for patient management are impressive. Numerous treatment issues arise from this perspective. For example: (1) How do exercise and food intake interact?

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Handbook of Eating Disorders: Physiology, Psychology, and Treatment of Obesity, Anorexia, and Bulimia
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 529

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.