Katherine Mansfield's Fiction

By Patrick D. Morrow | Go to book overview

Acknowledgements

Oh sure, I had read a a couple of KM short stories for my Ph D. comps, and later, I taught a couple more of her stories. But I really had no idea of what Katherine Mansfield was about until I went to New Zealand. Thus, I owe a great deal to the Fulbright Program for sending me twice to the South Pacific. While there, I came under the tutelage of Dr. Cherry Hankin, the Mansfield expert at the University of Canterbury. We certainly do not always agree, but she guides this eager student with a velvet hand. In Wellington, where there was a great deal of interest in Mansfield when I was there in 1989, I would like to thank several people, particularly the official and the unofficial curators of the Mansfield House on 25 Tinakori Road. My primary research was made possible through the kind assistance of the Alexander Turnbull Library, now part of the National Library of New Zealand in Wellington. I also would like to thank Brian Opie, Roger Robinson, and especially David Dowling for their help.

Stateside, I owe a lot of gratitude to Dr. Bert Hitchcock, former Head of the English Department at Auburn, for being a warm, understanding and reliable friend, who made it possible for me to include a significant amount of KM in two courses. I also owe a lot to the following colleagues, friends, and students: Cheryl Bailey, Scott Boozer, Mary Beth Bridges, Barbara Gellert, JoLee Gibbons, John Grimmett, Gwen Noles, Mary Rohrberger, Lee Anna Sellers, Sarah Webb and Mark Willis. I would like to thank Garland Press for allowing me to reprint parts of "Katherine Mansfield: The Idea of the Perfect Short Story," an article I did for them in 1989. Samantha Gill, Lea Seaborn and Linda DeWitt of War Eagle Typing did the typing from a very scarred and edited manuscript.

For the research apparatus, I have used an adaptation of the most recent MLA Handbook. For all substantial KM direct quotations in the text, a page number appears in parentheses directly after the quote. All quotes from Mansfield's stories come

-i-

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