Regulating the National Pastime: Baseball and Antitrust

By Jerold J. Duquette | Go to book overview

Introduction

It is said that few things in life are certain. Until the summer of 1994 most Americans would probably have said that, in addition to death and taxes, one thing that could be counted on was the World Series. Every fall since 1904 Americans had enjoyed the world championship of baseball. In 1994, this was not to be. This grand tradition was not interrupted by economic depression, world war, or even natural disaster. Nor was the Fall Classic canceled by an arrogant pennant winning manager unwilling to play against inferior talent. The 1994 World Series fell victim to a labor/management dispute. The player strike, baseball’s ninth work stoppage since 1970, was the culmination of three decades of unrest in the business of baseball.

The 1994 baseball strike exposed the less wholesome side of our national pastime more vividly than anything before. The business of baseball took a bit of the shine off what most considered a national treasure. Indeed, baseball seemed to be losing its special place in the American psyche. Long separated from discussions of politics and industrial relations, baseball was suddenly at the center of serious public policy debates at the highest levels of government. In this more somber atmosphere, the long dormant issue of baseball’s exemption from federal antitrust laws acquired a new life. Disgusted with the failure of the players and owners to come to an agreement, many, inside government and out, began pushing for repeal of the antitrust exemption as a way to pressure owners into an agreement with the players. The popular concern with baseball was reflected in both the appointment of a mediator by the President of the United States to bring

-xi-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Regulating the National Pastime: Baseball and Antitrust
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgements ix
  • Introduction xi
  • 1 - Progressivism and the Baseball Anomaly 1
  • 2 - The New Deal Era and the Baseball Anomaly 27
  • 3 - The New Politics of the Old Ball Game 59
  • 4 - The Baseball Anomaly in the 1990s 93
  • Conclusion—the Future of the Baseball Anomaly 135
  • Selected Bibliography 141
  • Index 155
  • About the Author 163
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 163

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.