Regulating the National Pastime: Baseball and Antitrust

By Jerold J. Duquette | Go to book overview

1

Progressivism and the Baseball Anomaly

Federal antitrust law is a significant legacy of the politics and the political thought of American progressivism. Antitrust law represents an approach to the regulation of the economy born in the last decades of the nineteenth century in the face of burgeoning industrialization. Baseball was born in Jacksonian America. It was a sport played by fraternal clubs. It was a recreational activity that created camaraderie among neighbors and fellow toilers in the new urban workplace.

By 1890, when the Sherman Antitrust Act became the law of the land, baseball had grown into a professional commercial enterprise. The National League had already replaced the National Association of Professional Baseball Players as organized baseball’s dominant institution and the game had already experienced the turmoil of strained labor/management relations that would be commonplace in the Industrial Age. 1 As the new century dawned, American industry flowered in the soil of progressivism’s vision of industrial regulation, while baseball’s evolution continued unchecked by the laws of commerce. By 1912, when the Clayton Antitrust Act gave further definition to the rules of the game in the realm of interstate commerce, baseball had weathered considerable turmoil in its ranks as a result of player revolts and interleague wars. Despite its highly visible strife, Major League Baseball, unlike any other industry of its scope, would never be forced to fully comply with federal antitrust law, nor would it fall under the jurisdiction of any federal regulatory agency. The celebrated Holmes decision of 1922 would suspend Major League Baseball in a seemingly preindustrial state.

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Regulating the National Pastime: Baseball and Antitrust
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgements ix
  • Introduction xi
  • 1 - Progressivism and the Baseball Anomaly 1
  • 2 - The New Deal Era and the Baseball Anomaly 27
  • 3 - The New Politics of the Old Ball Game 59
  • 4 - The Baseball Anomaly in the 1990s 93
  • Conclusion—the Future of the Baseball Anomaly 135
  • Selected Bibliography 141
  • Index 155
  • About the Author 163
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 163

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.