Gendarmes and the State in Nineteenth-Century Europe

By Clive Emsley | Go to book overview

15
'THE MAN PRAISING ORDER'

In one of the dialogues in Diderot Supplément au voyage de Bougainville, character B asks:

But do you want man to be happy and free? Then do not interfere in his affairs: there are enough unexpected chances in the world to lead him to enlightenment or vice; and always remember that it was not for your sake but for theirs that cunning legislators molded and misshaped you as they have done. Look at all the political, civil, and religious institutions; study them with care; and I am much mistaken or you will find Man, century after century, the yoke-ox of a handful of knaves. Mistrust the man who comes to you praising 'order;' creating order always means bullying others to their own discomfort. The Calabrians are almost the only people left, unseduced by the flattery of legislators.1

State jurists and apologists for the nation state would not have understood the satire. For them the state and its law were instruments of progress, bringing rationality and civilization where they had not existed before. While to some commentators, notably in France and Germany, the peasant might be the simple preserver of earlier, purer traditions of the nation, to others, particularly in Italy, he was ignorant, devious, and at times downright dangerous--Cesare Lombroso claimed to have found the inspiration for his theory of criminal man while serving as a military doctor during the Brigands' War in Calabria. In contrast to state jurists and apologists for the nation state, people on the Left, including a number of historians, have been inclined to see the state and its law as instruments of class authority, designed to impose the will of a social group and protect the needs of a means of production. At the same time, the work of anthropologists has suggested how, in peasant eyes, the laws of the nation state can appear as bizarre and wrong-headed as peasant practices are to the jurist. But whatever perspective is taken, the

____________________
1
Denis Diderot, This is Not a Story, and Other Stories, trans. with an introduction by P. N. Furbank ( Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1993), 109.

-251-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Gendarmes and the State in Nineteenth-Century Europe
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 288

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.