Introducing and Managing Academic Library Automation Projects

By John W. Head; Gerard B. McCabe | Go to book overview

reviewed had at least one individual responsible for system management, although the duties varied from site to site depending upon local policies and environment. Furthermore, the emphasis was toward developing in-house expertise and maintaining local control of the system. In those situations where a staff member was given the responsibility of managing the ILS in addition to his or her preexisting duties, the extra time and effort needed to properly manage the system was difficult, if not impossible, to achieve. Finally, cooperation with the computing center is essential. All of the libraries have operational links with university computing centers. The technical issues involved in linking to external resources such as the Internet, bibliographic utilities, and campus local area networks, require the expertise of those trained in computer and telecommunications technologies. In this way, both the library and the computing center benefit from a cooperative and congenial relationship.


REFERENCES

Crawford, Gregory A. 1991. ‘‘The Public Services Librarian As System Administrator.’’ In Proceedings of the Sixth Integrated Online Library Systems Meeting, ed. David C. Genaway. Medford, N.J.: Learned Information, pp. 33–38.

Epstein, Susan Baerg. 1991. ‘‘Administrators of Automated Systems: A Survey.’’ LibraryJournal 116 (July 15): 56–57.

Flower, Kenneth E. 1987. ‘‘Academic Libraries on the Periphery: How Telecommunications Information Policy Is Determined in Universities.’’ Journal of LibraryAdministration 8 (Summer): 93–107.

Johnson, Ralph N. 1991. ‘‘Managing Automation Through Distributed Responsibilities: An Academic Reference Department Model.’’ Library Software Review 10 (July– August): 275–276.

Leonard, Barbara G. 1993. ‘‘The Role of the Systems Librarian/Administrator: A Preliminary Report.’’ Library Administration & Management 7(2): 113–116.

Lucker, Jay K. 1993. ‘‘Sidebar 1: Relationships.’’ Library Hi Tech 11(1): 86.

Lynch, Clifford A. 1991. ‘‘The System Perspective.’’ In The Evolution of Library Automation: Management Issues and Future Perspectives, ed. Gary M. Pitkin. Westport, Conn.: Meckler, pp. 39–57.

Lynch, Tim. 1994. ‘‘The Many Roles of an Information Technology Section.’’ LibraryHi Tech 12(3): 38–43.

Martin, Susan K. 1988. ‘‘The Role of the Systems Librarian.’’ Journal of Library Administration 9(4): 57–68.

Metz, Ray E. 1991. ‘‘Library and Computing Staff: Learning from One Another.’’ In Proceedings of the Sixth Integrated Online Library Systems Meeting, ed. David C. Genaway. Medford, N.J.: Learned Information, pp. 97–102.

Montague, Eleanor. 1993. ‘‘Automation and the Library Administrator.’’ InformationTechnology and Libraries 12 (March); reprinted from Journal of Library Administration 11 (December 1978): 313–323.

Muirhead, Graeme A. 1993. ‘‘The Role of the Systems Librarian in Libraries in the United Kingdom.’’ Journal of Librarianship and Information Science 25 (September): 123–125.

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