Tony Hillerman: A Critical Companion

By John M. Reilly | Go to book overview

7

The Dark Wind
(1982)

Hillerman’s second novel about his ‘‘new’’ detective Jim Chee allows a rare insight into its process of composition. The author’s notes prefacing the book explain how he came by the knowledge of Hopi beliefs appearing in the text, while disclaiming any pretense to authority on the subject. In an essay about his writing published well after the appearance of The Dark Wind, Hillerman mentions the novel as an illustration of his practice of beginning with a thematic idea. In this case, he says, he ‘‘wanted to expose Tribal Policeman Jim Chee to a crime motivated by revenge—a white value which has no counterpart in the Navajo culture’’ (Winks 140). In an interview with Jon Breen, Hillerman states that he was stuck on the plot of the book until he and his wife went out to a Hopi Reservation where he read in the weekly newspaper that somebody had vandalized a windmill. The newspaper story got him moving again by providing a reason he could use to put Jim Chee where he had to be in the novel. Then, when he ‘‘began thinking why the mill would be vandalized [he saw] how it could be as important as the plot’’ (Companion 60).

Suggestive as Hillerman’s direct comments are, they are less important than the indirect evidence about composition of the novel that can be inferred from two related short stories about Jim Chee. The first story, ‘‘The Witch, Yazzie, and the Nine of Clubs,’’ was published in 1981, a year before The Dark Wind appeared. The second story, ‘‘Chee’s Witch,’’

-85-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Tony Hillerman: A Critical Companion
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents ix
  • Series Foreword xi
  • 1 - The Life of Tony Hillerman 1
  • 2 - Tony Hillerman and the Detective Fiction Genre 11
  • 3 - (1970) 21
  • 4 - (1971) 35
  • 5 - (1973) 51
  • 6 - (1980) 69
  • 7 - (1982) 85
  • 8 - (1984) 105
  • 9 - (1986) 125
  • 10 - (1988) 141
  • 11 - (1990) 157
  • 12 - (1993) 175
  • 13 - (1995) 191
  • Bibliography 201
  • Index 215
  • About the Author 219
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 221

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.