Anne Rice: A Critical Companion

By Jennifer Smith | Go to book overview

6

The Tale of the Body Thief
(1992)

Anne Rice had thought the Vampire Chronicles might be over with The Queen of the Damned, but Lestat the vampire had another story to tell. Having almost achieved godhood in The Queen of the Damned, Lestat journeys in the other direction in The Tale of the Body Thief and almost recovers his mortality. Haunted by dreams of Claudia, the lost daughter he made a vampire but did not save from death, and by visions of David Talbot, the older mortal man he longs to make a vampire and save from death, Lestat tries to escape, first by exposing himself to the sun which burns but does not kill him and then by agreeing to switch bodies for twenty-four hours with a mortal body thief named Raglan James. James disappears with Lestat’s body and part of Lestat’s fortune, and it’s evident that he has no intention of ever coming back. With David’s help, Lestat tracks James down. But when they recover Lestat’s body, James grabs David’s old body so that he can take his respected reputation and his fortune, leaving David in a new young form. This game of musical bodies turns out to be much more serious than any of the players had realized, leading not only to the deaths of two, but also to greater self-knowledge for all of them, unwelcome though it is. At the end of The Tale of the Body Thief, Lestat is back in his body, older, wiser, and surprised at the things he now knows about himself.

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Anne Rice: A Critical Companion
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Advisory Board vi
  • Contents vii
  • Series Foreword ix
  • 1 - The Life of Anne Rice 1
  • 2 - Supernatural Genres: Horror, Gothic, and Fantasy 9
  • 3 - (1976) 21
  • 4 - (1985) 43
  • 5 - (1988) 63
  • 6 - (1992) 83
  • 7 - (1995) 99
  • 8 - (1989) 115
  • 9 - (1990) 133
  • 10 - (1993) 151
  • 11 - (1994) 159
  • Bibliography 171
  • Index 187
  • About the Author 195
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