Working at the Bar: Sex Work and Health Communication in Thailand

By Thomas M. Steinfatt | Go to book overview

14

POLICY ON SEX WORK

The purpose of this book is to provide deep context for the study of foreign-oriented bar work in Thailand. This chapter considers questions of government policy related to sex work. Comments on policy considerations largely will be restricted to discussing the framework within which such considerations might be contemplated. In any consideration of policy, as a fundamental operating principle, those who will be most affected by legislation should be consulted and should have a major say in the deliberations and decisions. Active sex workers from all areas of the industry, as well as other employees of sex work establishments, management, and owners, need to be consulted and heeded on legislation regarding sex work. The same is certainly true for United Nations and International Labor Organization policy and laws in the United States and all countries of the world.


SEX WORK IS WORK

Sex workers are not slaves, and the vast majority or workers do not live their lives in slavery-like conditions. They are not the tools of “the dynamics of transnational capitalism, neo-colonialism, racism, and military domination, led by the US through international organizations such as the UN” (Noh, 1999), as Noh asserts. Sex workers are in fact sentient, rational, emotional human beings who make a rational individual choice to work in a way they perceive will maximize economic advantage to themselves, their loved ones, and their families. That is, they act in the same way other people do if given the choice to do so.

-341-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Working at the Bar: Sex Work and Health Communication in Thailand
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • 1 - On Studying Sex Work 1
  • 2 - Numbers and Types of Workers and Workplaces 17
  • 3 - The Routes to Bar Work 47
  • 4 - Reasons for Not Working 61
  • 5 - Moral and Religious Concerns 85
  • 6 - Bar Worker Demographics 101
  • 7 - Employment Statistics 127
  • 8 - Partner Selection and Negotiations 163
  • 9 - Aids in Thailand 185
  • 10 - Condom Use and Health Communication in Foreign-Oriented Bars 237
  • 11 - Hopes, Dreams, and the Future 249
  • 12 - Support Staff, Management, and Owners 275
  • 13 - Customer Motivation and Behavior 303
  • 14 - Policy on Sex Work 341
  • Glossary 379
  • References 401
  • Index 425
  • About the Author 436
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 436

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.